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A Seat At The Table: Social Justice Food for Thought Series

Student Engagement

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate, Faculty, Graduate, Postbaccalaureate, Postdoctoral, Staff

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Sinclair, LaTia
Lsinclair@gsu.edu

Address
55 Gilmer Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

A Seat At The Table: Social Justice Food for Thought Series is centered around 6 Social Justice Leaders and their legacy as a servant leader and Social Justice advocate. Attendees will engage in critical conversations around diversity, equity and inclusion and reflect on their own identity, intersectionality and capacity to make an impact.

Benefits

Through this dining experiences, we offer students a space to learn, lead and reflect on the legacy that they wish to leave. These events will also acknowledge individuals and organizations that are committed to social justice issues by awarding them a servant leader award.

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
First Generation, Gender, Military/Veteran Status, Political Ideology, Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Orientation

Race/Ethnic Group
American Indian, Asian, Black, Gender, Hispanic/ Latinx groups, Multi-racial, Pacific Islander, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiians

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
07/01/2014

Number Served

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

John Day
Bryon Jones
William Britto
Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms
Michael Bond

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Committee/council/group/advisory board/task force, Specialized center, Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

This series for social justice allows students to have dialogue and food.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Giving the students to opportunity to lead, to learn and to leave a legacy at Georgia State University

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

This series for social justice allows students to have dialogue and food.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Allow students to share how they feel about Social Justice

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, external review/evaluation, annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance

Outcome Milestones

Building community

Key Performance Indicators

Event attendance and input from students

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
07/01/2014

Number Served

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

John Day
Bryon Jones
William Britto
Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms
Michael Bond

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Committee/council/group/advisory board/task force, Specialized center, Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

This series for social justice allows students to have dialogue and food.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Giving the students to opportunity to lead, to learn and to leave a legacy at Georgia State University

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

This series for social justice allows students to have dialogue and food.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Allow students to share how they feel about Social Justice

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, external review/evaluation, annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance