Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Alternative Spring Break

College of Law

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Graduate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Meals, Darcy
dmeals@gsu.edu

Address
85 Park Place N.E.
Atlanta, GA 30303

Building
College of Law

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding),Other Source

Overview

The Center’s Alternative Spring Break trips give students a chance to spend a week immersed in an area of law, engaging in related pro bono service. Students work with licensed attorneys to receive training and put their skills into practice.

Benefits

Participants gain awareness of community needs and of their own ability to provide legal support for underrepresented groups. They work with supervising attorneys from a number of non-profit organizations to practice legal skills and develop professionally while serving the community. Participants are recognized at Honors Day and at a reception hosted by the law school dean.

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Other, All law students are eligible to participate

Race/Ethnic Group
Other, All law students are eligible to participate

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
03/01/2017

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation
Truancy Intervention Project
Southern Poverty Law Center
Mississippi Office of the State Public Defender
Georgia Legal Services Program

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series),Study abroad/exchange/ travel, creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Students work with supervising attorneys to provide direct service or conduct research/develop materials to help underrepresented groups with their legal needs. In just a week, students gain significant awareness of the depth of a legal issue facing an underrepresented community and the students see their role in providing necessary support.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs
Not Applicable

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols)

Additional Information

feedback from organizational partners

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Students are honored with a reception hosted by the dean, where they share their stories from Alternative Spring Break with law school administration and representatives from the community organizations with whom we partner. Students are also honored at Honors Day. Spring Break trips are also highlighted in College of Law and Center for Access to Justice newsletters.

Evaluation Methods

newsletter, program survey(s),other

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of abroad/exchange experience, increasing academic skill area (s),Other

Other: Increased awareness of underrepresented community's legal needs

Outcome Milestones

developing awareness, building connections with community organizations, establishing a foundation of service for their legal careers

Key Performance Indicators

Student feedback/survey results, organizational partners’ feedback, number of students interested/applying

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
03/01/2017

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation
Truancy Intervention Project
Southern Poverty Law Center
Mississippi Office of the State Public Defender
Georgia Legal Services Program

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series),Study abroad/exchange/ travel, creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Students work with supervising attorneys to provide direct service or conduct research/develop materials to help underrepresented groups with their legal needs. In just a week, students gain significant awareness of the depth of a legal issue facing an underrepresented community and the students see their role in providing necessary support.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?
Not Applicable

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols)

Additional Information

feedback from organizational partners

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Students are honored with a reception hosted by the dean, where they share their stories from Alternative Spring Break with law school administration and representatives from the community organizations with whom we partner. Students are also honored at Honors Day. Spring Break trips are also highlighted in College of Law and Center for Access to Justice newsletters.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

newsletter, program survey(s),other

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of abroad/exchange experience, increasing academic skill area (s),Other

Other: Increased awareness of underrepresented community's legal needs