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Andrew Young School Pipeline Project

Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
N/A

Contact Information
Chen, Frances; Almada, Lorenzo
rchen6@gsu.edu
404-413-1036

Address
14 Marietta Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Other Source

Overview

The Pipeline project provides informal mentorship of the current graduate students to the undergraduate student (hereafter, candidate) who are in good academic standing and recommended by faculty members, to help them figure out whether graduate school is right for them. Such information and mentorship are generally lacking in the underrepresented students and we fill in this gap. With our diverse body of undergraduate students, we hope to build a pipeline that feeds into our graduate program.

Benefits

Each undergraduate student is paired with a mentor, the pair will set their pace how they would like to work together. The core role of the mentors is to provide and initiate a conversation regarding graduate school and career planning, including but not limited to how to find out whether graduate school is right for them and what other options they have, tuition and scholarship, application process.

Each Mentor receives a conference travel stipend of $400.

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Social Sciences

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Age, First Generation, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Black, Hispanic/ Latinx groups

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/2017

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The program provides professional development sessions to the mentors where they learn communication skills and additional travel stipend to attend academic conferences in the field.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

networking events with mentors

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Acknowledging students where they are (i.e. academic, research, life) in discussions, providing informal mentorship to help them develop their career and expose them to information they may not have access to in their immediate friend or family circle due to being first generation college students and/or underrepresented.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences)

Additional Information

Annual review

Participant Empowerment

Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events that provide opportunities for participants to discuss their journey ; Evaluation methods to allow participates to provide feedback

Evaluation Methods

other

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

earning acceptance to graduate school, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

The program is still in its infancy stage and we are monitoring the outcomes.

Key Performance Indicators

Admission to graduate school

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/2017

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The program provides professional development sessions to the mentors where they learn communication skills and additional travel stipend to attend academic conferences in the field.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

networking events with mentors

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Acknowledging students where they are (i.e. academic, research, life) in discussions, providing informal mentorship to help them develop their career and expose them to information they may not have access to in their immediate friend or family circle due to being first generation college students and/or underrepresented.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences)

Additional Information

Annual review

Participant Empowerment

Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events that provide opportunities for participants to discuss their journey ; Evaluation methods to allow participates to provide feedback

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

other

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

earning acceptance to graduate school, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)