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APPAM Public Policy Camp

Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Liu, Cathy
cyliu@gsu.edu

Address
14 Marietta Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Discipline Specific Society

Overview

The Public Policy Camp is an APPAM (Association for Public Policy Analysis & Management) initiative aimed at introducing the field of public policy to underrepresented undergraduate students who might not otherwise be familiar with it and increasing the pipeline of diverse students into graduate public policy and public affairs schools or professional fields. It has an application process and only 2-3 schools are selected each year as hosts.

Benefits

The Andrew Young School prides itself in the diversity of its faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners. Our students represent many different backgrounds, about 59 percent being women and nearly one half being African Americans. We value diversity in all its forms and consider it as one of the greatest assets in our instruction, research and community engagement. Hence we applied to the APPAM Public Policy Camp last fall and was selected. The program is fully funded by APPAM.
This camp is a one-day program that exposes under-represented undergraduate students to the academic and professional field of public policy through workshops, breakout sessions and social interactions. It is open to all interested area students free of charge with their transportation cost reimbursed. They will hear from our students, faculty and staff, alumni and community partners and policy professionals to be exposed to various aspects of this field.

Supplemental Materials

APPAM Public Policy Camp Proposal

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
First Generation, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Black, Hispanic/ Latinx groups

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
04/01/2021

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

While the details of this one-day event is being planned, we expect that participating students will hear from panels of our faculty, center researchers as well as staff members from career services, alumni relations and admissions. They will also hear from current and former students about their experiences. We also hope to draw from our connections and community partners to ensure diverse and representative panels of working professionals are formed.

Self-efficacy Emphasis
Not Applicable

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

While the details of this one-day event is being planned, we expect that participating students will hear from panels of our faculty, center researchers as well as staff members from career services, alumni relations and admissions. They will also hear from current and former students about their experiences. We also hope to draw from our connections and community partners to ensure diverse and representative panels of working professionals are formed.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences)

Participant Empowerment

Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
04/01/2021

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

While the details of this one-day event is being planned, we expect that participating students will hear from panels of our faculty, center researchers as well as staff members from career services, alumni relations and admissions. They will also hear from current and former students about their experiences. We also hope to draw from our connections and community partners to ensure diverse and representative panels of working professionals are formed.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?
Not Applicable

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

While the details of this one-day event is being planned, we expect that participating students will hear from panels of our faculty, center researchers as well as staff members from career services, alumni relations and admissions. They will also hear from current and former students about their experiences. We also hope to draw from our connections and community partners to ensure diverse and representative panels of working professionals are formed.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences)

Participant Empowerment

Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)