Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Ascend

J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Livnat, Ira
ilivnat2@student.gsu.edu

Address
55 Park Place
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

This is a student chapter of Ascend, the largest Pan-Asian organization for business professionals in the United States. This university-level club provides the standard opportunities available to participants, including leadership opportunities, professional development and network building.

Benefits

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Business Management

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity

Race/Ethnic Group
Asian

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
09/01/2010

Number Served
101-500

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Ira Livnat
Eleanor Chin
Craig Ruff

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

“…”

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Student groups provide many opportunities for students to develop their teamwork, strategy and planning skills from organizing events and generally managing the organization.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs
Not Applicable

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Not Applicable

Participant Empowerment

Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, external review/evaluation

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, persisting through current degree program, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

“…”

Key Performance Indicators

Event Attendance

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
09/01/2010

Number Served
101-500

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Ira Livnat
Eleanor Chin
Craig Ruff

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

“…”

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Student groups provide many opportunities for students to develop their teamwork, strategy and planning skills from organizing events and generally managing the organization.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?
Not Applicable

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Not Applicable

Participant Empowerment

Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, external review/evaluation

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, persisting through current degree program, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)