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Big Ideas

Student Engagement

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Clement, Kristina
kclement@gsu.edu

Address
66 Courtland Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

The Big Ideas program gives students the opportunity to look at societal issues such as immigration, voting rights and environmental regulations through a critical lens that seeks to expose systemic racism, sexism, homophobia and classism. Presented with background information about current events, students analyze the problems from multiple perspectives and consider possible actions they can take towards resolving the social issues.

Benefits

Awareness of multiple factors influencing societal issues
Ability to identify sources of complex problems
Develop solutions to complex problems
Opportunity to connect with diverse participants and hear multiple perspectives on a single issue

Supplemental Materials

Big Ideas Narrative

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Age, Gender, Political Ideology, Race/Ethnicity, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/15/2014

Number Served
101-500

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Each semester, the Big Ideas series takes a deep dive into current events and issues that are in the news to help students better understand the issue’s background and the various ways that race, gender, sexuality, class and other designations might interplay with the issue. Topics covered recently include: social media usage, climate change, presidential politics, immigration, health care, cost of living, gender inequality, generational differences, income inequality, racism in America and religious conflicts.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Through workshops, students have the opportunity to develop their own positions on key societal issues and practice articulating that positions to others.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Each semester, the Big Ideas series takes a deep dive into current events and issues that are in the news to help students better understand the issue’s background and the various ways that race, gender, sexuality, class and other designations might interplay with the issue. Topics covered recently include: social media usage, climate change, presidential politics, immigration, health care, cost of living, gender inequality, generational differences, income inequality, racism in America and religious conflicts.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues)

Participant Empowerment

Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders)

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Students have the opportunities to dialogue with others during the event and share their experiences and perspectives.

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, journal, diary, written review of exhibit

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, Other

Other: Student Leadership Certificate (co-curricular)

Outcome Milestones

Key Performance Indicators

We utilize event attendance and a built in survey automatically emailed to participants to track students’ evaluations of the programs.

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/15/2014

Number Served
101-500

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Each semester, the Big Ideas series takes a deep dive into current events and issues that are in the news to help students better understand the issue’s background and the various ways that race, gender, sexuality, class and other designations might interplay with the issue. Topics covered recently include: social media usage, climate change, presidential politics, immigration, health care, cost of living, gender inequality, generational differences, income inequality, racism in America and religious conflicts.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Through workshops, students have the opportunity to develop their own positions on key societal issues and practice articulating that positions to others.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Each semester, the Big Ideas series takes a deep dive into current events and issues that are in the news to help students better understand the issue’s background and the various ways that race, gender, sexuality, class and other designations might interplay with the issue. Topics covered recently include: social media usage, climate change, presidential politics, immigration, health care, cost of living, gender inequality, generational differences, income inequality, racism in America and religious conflicts.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues)

Participant Empowerment

Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders)

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Students have the opportunities to dialogue with others during the event and share their experiences and perspectives.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, journal, diary, written review of exhibit

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, Other

Other: Student Leadership Certificate (co-curricular)