Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Community Connections Mentoring Program

Student Engagement

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate, Faculty, Graduate, Postbaccalaureate, Postdoctoral, Staff

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Sinclair, LaTia
Lsinclair@gsu.edu
404-413-1584

Address
55 Gilmer Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

Are you a Student of Color? First Generation? LGBTQ? Could you benefit from a mentor or support network at GSU? The Community Connections Mentoring Program (C2) is a unique opportunity designed for YOU to feel a sense of belonging and help you be successful from college to career. Connect with other students, meet and be mentored by upperclassmen peers, faculty/staff or community partners and engage in personal growth, leadership development, career readiness and more.

Benefits

Each student will be mentored by a professional
Each student will attend special events on campus and off campus
Each student will get career development advice
Each student will participate in different workshops
Each student will develop networking skills

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
First Generation, Gender, Military/Veteran Status, Political Ideology, Race/Ethnicity, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
American Indian, Asian, Black, Gender, Hispanic/ Latinx groups, Multi-racial, Pacific Islander, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiians

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
07/01/2014

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

You can expect regular contact with your mentors, access to campus programs, off-campus events and services only for program participants.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Networking events with mentors and helping the student to get through the journey of being a college student

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Dialogue on the importance of mentoring
Sharing of resources between mentor and mentee
Fostering strong relationships with mentor and mentee

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events will allow the student to expand their horizon and Evaluations will provide important feedback

Evaluation Methods

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)

Outcome Milestones

# of students who move on to the next level of their academic career

Key Performance Indicators

#of successful mentors and mentees and #number of students are who are more actively engaged at the university and #number of students

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
07/01/2014

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

You can expect regular contact with your mentors, access to campus programs, off-campus events and services only for program participants.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Networking events with mentors and helping the student to get through the journey of being a college student

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Dialogue on the importance of mentoring
Sharing of resources between mentor and mentee
Fostering strong relationships with mentor and mentee

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events will allow the student to expand their horizon and Evaluations will provide important feedback

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)