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Byrdine F. Lewis College of Nursing and Health Professions

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Graduate, Other

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Aycock, Dawn
daycock@gsu.edu

Address
140 Decatur Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Overview

Georgia’s (GA) workforce and health system are underprepared to address the unique healthcare needs of the rapidly growing, racially and ethnically diverse population of older adults. The purpose of the GA GEAR is to improve the health and well-being of older Georgians, their families and their communities. This will be accomplished through partnerships in a program of interdisciplinary education to improve health outcomes across urban and rural areas while addressing the five objectives of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) GA GEAR Program. The School of Nursing at Georgia State will work with GA GEAR to provide training on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD). Georgia State’s work will address the provision of training on the ADRD through an educational outreach program in the African American faith community, Dementia-Friendly Faith Congregation community program. Faith-based communities are important outlets for health-related information and access to services, particularly for African Americans. Historically, churches have been a safe haven for African American families, but many churches do not have programs to support families/congregants living with dementia. The Dementia-Friendly Faith Village Community Program (a nurse-led program) will offer workshops and community forums and include health profession students/trainees. The community forums (2 hrs.) and workshops (4 hrs.) include lectures, testimonies, memory screenings and simulated dementia experiences. Georgia State will further implement, expand and evaluate this program in African American congregations in the Atlanta metro area and replicate the program where Memory Assessment Centers are located (Albany, Augusta, Columbus, or Macon). Ultimately, the program will provide churches with the knowledge needed to support African American families living with dementia.

Benefits

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Age, Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Black

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
7/1/2019

Number Served
501-1000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Ted Johnson, MD, MPH – PI and Georgia GEAR Program Director, Emory University School of Medicine
Fayron Epps, PhD, RN – Georgia GEAR Collaborator, Dementia Friendly Faith Village Director, Emory University School of Nursing

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Committee/council/group/advisory board/task force, Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series) (7), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity, and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements), Practices & Procedures (e.g., accountability, recruitment, retention, hiring, promotion, tenure, compensation, guided pathways (leadership), financial aid, technology, land use and acknowledgement, vendor agreements, partnerships with educational, labor, government, business and community organizations)

Self-efficacy Emphasis

TBA

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

TBA

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

TBA

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Evaluation Methods

Average attendance to events, Outreach partnerships, Course/curricula content changes, Advisory board/external review/evaluation, Annual performance report, Newsletter, Program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

Attendance, Completion of a course(s), Presenting at a conference/symposium, Persisting through current degree program, Earning a degree, Obtaining employment (industry or other sector)

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
7/1/2019

Number Served
501-1000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Ted Johnson, MD, MPH – PI and Georgia GEAR Program Director, Emory University School of Medicine
Fayron Epps, PhD, RN – Georgia GEAR Collaborator, Dementia Friendly Faith Village Director, Emory University School of Nursing

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Committee/council/group/advisory board/task force, Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series) (7), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity, and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements), Practices & Procedures (e.g., accountability, recruitment, retention, hiring, promotion, tenure, compensation, guided pathways (leadership), financial aid, technology, land use and acknowledgement, vendor agreements, partnerships with educational, labor, government, business and community organizations)

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

TBA

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

TBA

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

TBA

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

Average attendance to events, Outreach partnerships, Course/curricula content changes, Advisory board/external review/evaluation, Annual performance report, Newsletter, Program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

Attendance, Completion of a course(s), Presenting at a conference/symposium, Persisting through current degree program, Earning a degree, Obtaining employment (industry or other sector)