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Digital Learners to Leaders

Center For Excellence In Teaching, Learning and Online Education (CETLOE)

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate, Postbaccalaureate, Pre-Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Jackie Slaton
jslaton@gsu.edu
404-413-4741

Address
103 Decatur Street, Suite 100
Atlanta, GA 30302

Building
Library South

Campus
Atlanta, Clarkston, Decatur, Dunwoody

Funding

Private Foundation

Overview

Through Digital Learners to Leaders (DLL), student-led teams create digital solutions to real challenges students identify. Students are able to grow digital skills and develop portfolios, with support and guidance from a diverse group of technology professionals in Atlanta’s education, business, government and non-profit communities. DLL provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate to future employers skill sets in digitization and problem solving. Participating in DLL will sets students apart and sets them up for academic and interpersonal success. The Digital Learners to Leaders program increases digital literacy of Georgia State and high school students, focusing on female and minority student, and creates a path for more diverse students to pursue studies in computer science and technology.

Benefits

Participating in the Digital Learners to Leaders Program allows Georgia State students to accomplish the following:

  • Explore technology with diverse groups of industry leaders
  • Develop strong leadership and academic skills
  • Enhance their Digital Portfolio
  • Strengthen collaborative and management skills

Discipline Focus
Computer & Information Sciences

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
First Generation, Gender, Race/Ethnicity

Race/Ethnic Group
Asian, Black, Gender, Hispanic/ Latinx groups, Multi-racial

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
Spring 2018

Number Served
501-1000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Silicon Valley Community Foundation via Cisco Responsibility
The National Center for Civil and Human Rights
Dell Corporation
State Farm
City of Atlanta

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series) (7), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Speaker honorarium/stipend, Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity, and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Challenges issued by leaders in the Atlanta business, education, government and nonprofit communities require students to use digitization or IoT to create solutions for challenges often found in urban areas. A series of workshops teach, inspire and challenge team members throughout the challenge, allowing subject experts in computer science and technology fields to assist the assembled teams in laying out a project development plan, introducing digital literacy to some students while strengthening the advanced technology and digital skills for others, with all students working together toward solving the challenge.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Digital Learners to Leaders promotes digital literacy, digitization, and technology as a problem-solving tool to improve urban cities, particularly under-served and underrepresented communities, allowing students of diverse race, gender and ethnicities to explore their intersectionality, and also establishes a pipeline that leads to more diverse graduates in Computer and Technology studies and careers. Participating in the DLL program contributes to digital portfolios, giving students the opportunity to demonstrate to future employers their skill sets in both digitization and the IoT.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Digital Learners to Leaders appeals not only to the diversity of race, gender or ethnicity of Georgia State students but it also appeal to the diverse academic backgrounds of each team member. The curriculum focuses on digital skills that are sought not only in the computer and technology industry but also in various other professional sectors, allowing subject experts to speak on career opportunities for students using those skills before challenging students to use them while working in interactive environments.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

CETL developed Digital Learners to Leaders (DLL) as a solution to underrepresentation of women and minorities in technology. DLL targets female and minority students to become more digitally literate and create solutions for challenges facing urban cities. Digital Learners to Leaders relies on both external and internal community partnerships with business, academic, and government leaders to mentor students and to present relevant workforce topics to students throughout the duration of the program. DLL also establishes collaborative partnerships with companies and organizations who educate our students on relevant topics in STEM and offer them mentorship that better Georgia State, including Perimeter College students with the skillsets required to successfully enter the workforce.

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Working with a team of students from diverse backgrounds, cultures, and majors, the Digital Learners to Leaders Program allows students to work collectively, each bringing together their unique differences and skill sets, and empowering them to work in teams to problem solve, use digitization and IOT and create solutions to challenges found in their communities.

Evaluation Methods

Average attendance to events, Outreach partnerships, Advisory board/external review/evaluation, Annual performance report, Site visit, Program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

Attendance, Presenting at a conference/symposium, Increasing academic skill area (s), Obtaining employment (industry or other sector), Moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

The assessments of Digital Learners to Leaders has shown an average increase of 33% of digital and professional skill sets of participating students. As a program that targets participation of students from underrepresented communities, DLL provides knowledge, information, and resources that help create develop digital leaders in the Georgia State community who become equipped to impact other communities.

Key Performance Indicators

Assessments measures growth in knowledge and skill sets in areas such as Introduction to Internet of Things, Introduction to Product Ideation/Design Thinking, Introduction to User Experience Design, Advanced Digital Makerspace Project Design, and Entrepreneurship, Online coding and career development.

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
Spring 2018

Number Served
501-1000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Silicon Valley Community Foundation via Cisco Responsibility
The National Center for Civil and Human Rights
Dell Corporation
State Farm
City of Atlanta

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series) (7), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Speaker honorarium/stipend, Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity, and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Challenges issued by leaders in the Atlanta business, education, government and nonprofit communities require students to use digitization or IoT to create solutions for challenges often found in urban areas. A series of workshops teach, inspire and challenge team members throughout the challenge, allowing subject experts in computer science and technology fields to assist the assembled teams in laying out a project development plan, introducing digital literacy to some students while strengthening the advanced technology and digital skills for others, with all students working together toward solving the challenge.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Digital Learners to Leaders promotes digital literacy, digitization, and technology as a problem-solving tool to improve urban cities, particularly under-served and underrepresented communities, allowing students of diverse race, gender and ethnicities to explore their intersectionality, and also establishes a pipeline that leads to more diverse graduates in Computer and Technology studies and careers. Participating in the DLL program contributes to digital portfolios, giving students the opportunity to demonstrate to future employers their skill sets in both digitization and the IoT.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Digital Learners to Leaders appeals not only to the diversity of race, gender or ethnicity of Georgia State students but it also appeal to the diverse academic backgrounds of each team member. The curriculum focuses on digital skills that are sought not only in the computer and technology industry but also in various other professional sectors, allowing subject experts to speak on career opportunities for students using those skills before challenging students to use them while working in interactive environments.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

CETL developed Digital Learners to Leaders (DLL) as a solution to underrepresentation of women and minorities in technology. DLL targets female and minority students to become more digitally literate and create solutions for challenges facing urban cities. Digital Learners to Leaders relies on both external and internal community partnerships with business, academic, and government leaders to mentor students and to present relevant workforce topics to students throughout the duration of the program. DLL also establishes collaborative partnerships with companies and organizations who educate our students on relevant topics in STEM and offer them mentorship that better Georgia State, including Perimeter College students with the skillsets required to successfully enter the workforce.

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Working with a team of students from diverse backgrounds, cultures, and majors, the Digital Learners to Leaders Program allows students to work collectively, each bringing together their unique differences and skill sets, and empowering them to work in teams to problem solve, use digitization and IOT and create solutions to challenges found in their communities.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

Average attendance to events, Outreach partnerships, Advisory board/external review/evaluation, Annual performance report, Site visit, Program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

Attendance, Presenting at a conference/symposium, Increasing academic skill area (s), Obtaining employment (industry or other sector), Moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)