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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service

Student Engagement

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate, Graduate, Postbaccalaureate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Jones, Byron
bjones164@gsu.edu

Address
55 Gilmer Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Alpharetta, Atlanta, Clarkston, Decatur, Dunwoody, Newton

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

MLK Day of Service is part of an annual series of events that is held in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The Day of Service honors Dr. King's legacy of service by building unity and relationships across campuses and communities around the world. Students, faculty and staff contribute to the Atlanta community on this powerful day through a variety of service opportunities and learn how they can continue to volunteer throughout the year.

Benefits

Benefits:
Connectivity to the campus and community
Awareness of local resources
Community building with non-profits

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/01/2009

Number Served

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The event honors and celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by engaging students in service as a way to build unity among communities and empower individuals to greatness.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

This event empowers students to become civically engaged by providing them with service opportunities and connections in the community.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

The event honors and celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by engaging students in service as a way to build unity among communities and empower individuals to greatness.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues)

Participant Empowerment

None of the above

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

All projects conclude with facilitated group reflection, giving all participants the opportunity to share their experience and give feedback

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance

Outcome Milestones

“…”

Key Performance Indicators

Event Attendance, Survey Ratings

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/01/2009

Number Served

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The event honors and celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by engaging students in service as a way to build unity among communities and empower individuals to greatness.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

This event empowers students to become civically engaged by providing them with service opportunities and connections in the community.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

The event honors and celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by engaging students in service as a way to build unity among communities and empower individuals to greatness.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues)

Participant Empowerment

None of the above

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

All projects conclude with facilitated group reflection, giving all participants the opportunity to share their experience and give feedback

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance