Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Early College Program

Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence, College of Education and Human Development

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate, Pre-Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Davis, Tene
tdavis134@gsu.edu
404-413-8074

Address
30 Pryor Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Multiple Sponsors

Overview

The Early College program is designed to introduce college early to students within underrepresented background- low SES, students of color, ELL's, black males, first generation college goers. Students are enrolled in either an Early College high school or an Early College program at the high school. The accelerated high school curriculum allows students to begin taking college courses during their 11th grade year in anticipation that upon high school graduation, students will enroll in college.

Benefits

Beginning their 11th grade year, students begin taking college course for free that will count for actual college credits. Most of our students graduate high school with at least 24 college credits. Additionally students are provided books free of charge.
Some of the intangibles are: the power of place, mentorship and specific instruction related to being a successful and professional student.

Supplemental Materials

Class of 2019 Statistics

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, Age, First Generation, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Black, Hispanic/ Latinx groups

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2005

Number Served
501-1000

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), development of intellectual property as specified by academic discipline

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

IRB Approved survey, Dr. Kim White – Dissertation: Exploring College Readiness: Self-Perceptions of Early College Students
Selected conference presentations:
Clayton, L and Ray, C (February, 2020). The Georgia State University Early College Program: Elevating the Next Generation. Presentation at the National Association of Professional, NJ
Harris Davis, T (2017, October). Georgia State University Early College Program: From Theory to Practice. Presentation at the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, Washington, DC.
Harris Davis, T (2017, March). Placing the Bar High: Early College Experiences of Urban Black High School Students Attending a Large, Competitive Research University. Presentation at the National Association of Professional Development Schools, Washington, DC.
Harris Davis, T (2017, February). Early Intervention, Early Learning, Early College: A Roadmap to Success. Presentation at the KnowledgeWorks Experience Conference, Lake Buena Vista, FL.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

We host small group weekly meetings with all of our students during the Fall and Spring semesters in which topics such as this are intricately interwoven in the lessons. Additionally our mandatory four-week summer enrichment program focuses on topics such as this in our classes, fieldtrips and guest speakers.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

We host small group weekly meetings with all of our students during the Fall and Spring semesters in which topics such as this are intricately interwoven in the lessons. Additionally our mandatory four-week summer enrichment program focuses on topics such as this in our classes, fieldtrips and guest speakers.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

GPAs and Credits earned

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

The Early College program has an IRB approved survey that we give to our current students and alumni to evaluate the program. Our social media platforms regularly spotlight our students. During our weekly meetings with our students, our students’ feedback is regularly provided.

Evaluation Methods

program survey(s),other

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),publishing a scholarly work as defined by an academic discipline, presenting at a conference/symposium, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

Please see the attached spreadsheet detailing the data collected yearly in conjunction with the Office of Institutional Effectiveness

Key Performance Indicators

In addition to the data represented on the attached spreadsheet detailing date collected yearly in conjunction with the Office of Institutional Effectiveness, we also provide the attached graduating class statistics yearly to the CEHD Dean detailing high school graduation rates and college acceptances. We also provide SAT preparation, Financial Aid presentations from the Georgia State Financial Aid Office, as well as professional Scholarship search help from the Scholarship Academy.

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2005

Number Served
501-1000

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), development of intellectual property as specified by academic discipline

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

IRB Approved survey, Dr. Kim White – Dissertation: Exploring College Readiness: Self-Perceptions of Early College Students
Selected conference presentations:
Clayton, L and Ray, C (February, 2020). The Georgia State University Early College Program: Elevating the Next Generation. Presentation at the National Association of Professional, NJ
Harris Davis, T (2017, October). Georgia State University Early College Program: From Theory to Practice. Presentation at the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, Washington, DC.
Harris Davis, T (2017, March). Placing the Bar High: Early College Experiences of Urban Black High School Students Attending a Large, Competitive Research University. Presentation at the National Association of Professional Development Schools, Washington, DC.
Harris Davis, T (2017, February). Early Intervention, Early Learning, Early College: A Roadmap to Success. Presentation at the KnowledgeWorks Experience Conference, Lake Buena Vista, FL.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

We host small group weekly meetings with all of our students during the Fall and Spring semesters in which topics such as this are intricately interwoven in the lessons. Additionally our mandatory four-week summer enrichment program focuses on topics such as this in our classes, fieldtrips and guest speakers.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

We host small group weekly meetings with all of our students during the Fall and Spring semesters in which topics such as this are intricately interwoven in the lessons. Additionally our mandatory four-week summer enrichment program focuses on topics such as this in our classes, fieldtrips and guest speakers.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

GPAs and Credits earned

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

The Early College program has an IRB approved survey that we give to our current students and alumni to evaluate the program. Our social media platforms regularly spotlight our students. During our weekly meetings with our students, our students’ feedback is regularly provided.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

program survey(s),other

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),publishing a scholarly work as defined by an academic discipline, presenting at a conference/symposium, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)