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Georgia State Postdoctoral Training On Adult Literacy: G-Pal

College of Education and Human Development

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Postdoctoral

Program Website

Contact Information
Greenberg, Daphne
dgreenberg@gsu.edu
404-413-8337

Address
1 Park Place South
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

US Department of Education (ED)

Overview

The focus of this training program is to prepare postdoctoral fellows to conduct education research in adult literacy. Fellows will be prepared to conduct high-quality, rigorous research to inform the interventions and measurement relevant to improving the literacy outcomes of adults 16-years old and older, outside of the K-12 system, who have basic skill gaps. Fellows will receive specific training on adult literacy issues (such as sensitivity training) and hands-on training in research methods and analyses. As a result of this training, fellows will be prepared to conduct research on adult samples drawn from different education settings, to communicate across fields and with technical and nontechnical audiences, and to help inform policy and practice relevant to a large portion of adults who struggle with basic skills.

Benefits

Fellows will receive a stipend of $60,000, along with a full fringe benefit package, travel costs to the annual IES PI meeting and a personal research budget of $21,821. Each fellow will develop a spending plan for this research budget. Depending on the research and training interests of the fellow, he or she may use these funds for costs such as equipment (e.g., laptop, data or software licenses), travel to conferences or workshops, or payment for research participants. Fellows are guaranteed 1-year’s funding with a second year being conditional upon making progress.

Supplemental Materials

GPAL Narrative

Discipline Focus
Education

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
First Generation, Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Black

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/2020

Number Served
0-50

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend, development of intellectual property as specified by academic discipline

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Fellows will be prepared to conduct research on adult samples drawn from different education settings, to communicate across fields and with technical and nontechnical audiences, and to help inform policy and practice relevant to a large portion of adults who struggle with basic skills. Each fellow will be paired with a senior mentor who will work closely with the fellow on existing funded projects while developing skills as a researcher, scholar, and communicator. Training includes four main components: (1) individualized work with a senior investigator, (2) experience learning and using rigorous methods and statistics, (3) immersion in a scientifically rigorous community of scholarship, and (4) mentored experiences in consultation with educational stakeholders (for example, state/federal agencies, district policymakers and practitioner groups).

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Fellows will complete self-evaluations and will meet with mentor’s regularly to celebrate successes and discuss actions to help overcome challenges and difficulties.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

By encouraging the fellow to voice his/her goals and interests, and to select studies that meet their needs.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

Fellows will be engaged in all lab discussions, will present at conferences and be encouraged to attend workshops.

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Fellows will be encouraged to engage in their own small studies of interest. They will be encouraged to share their goals and interests at all meetings.

Evaluation Methods

annual performance report, other

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),publishing a scholarly work as defined by an academic discipline, presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Key Performance Indicators

We track success in terms of recruitment, training, and postdoc outcomes.

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/2020

Number Served
0-50

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend, development of intellectual property as specified by academic discipline

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Fellows will be prepared to conduct research on adult samples drawn from different education settings, to communicate across fields and with technical and nontechnical audiences, and to help inform policy and practice relevant to a large portion of adults who struggle with basic skills. Each fellow will be paired with a senior mentor who will work closely with the fellow on existing funded projects while developing skills as a researcher, scholar, and communicator. Training includes four main components: (1) individualized work with a senior investigator, (2) experience learning and using rigorous methods and statistics, (3) immersion in a scientifically rigorous community of scholarship, and (4) mentored experiences in consultation with educational stakeholders (for example, state/federal agencies, district policymakers and practitioner groups).

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Fellows will complete self-evaluations and will meet with mentor’s regularly to celebrate successes and discuss actions to help overcome challenges and difficulties.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

By encouraging the fellow to voice his/her goals and interests, and to select studies that meet their needs.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

Fellows will be engaged in all lab discussions, will present at conferences and be encouraged to attend workshops.

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Fellows will be encouraged to engage in their own small studies of interest. They will be encouraged to share their goals and interests at all meetings.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

annual performance report, other

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),publishing a scholarly work as defined by an academic discipline, presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)