Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Herndon Human Rights Initiative

Honors College

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Cook, Sarah
scook@gsu.edu
404-413-5579

Address
100 Auburn Ave
Atlanta, GA 30303

Building
Centennial Hall

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Private Foundation

Overview

The Herndon Human Rights Initiative is sponsored by a generous gift from the Rich Foundation. Together, Sarah L. Cook, PhD., Professor and Associate Dean of the Honors College, Karcheik Sims-Alvarado, PhD., Historian and CEO, Preserve Black Atlanta and Dean Baker, City Saga founder, have been leading seminar courses on the legacy of Alonzo F. and Norris B. Herndon. Their students are working to honor the civil and human rights achievements of Alonzo Herndon and his son Norris.

Benefits

The Honors College teaches one seminar each year on the Herndon legacy and a related topic. The grant also sponsors one scholarship per year to a student who is active in human rights through scholarship, research, service, or creative works. The scholarship if $500 per semester from time of award to graduation with a maximum of 7 semesters.

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
01/01/2015

Number Served
51-100

Notable Alumni

Evan Marlbrough, Founder, Georgia Youth Poll Worker Project

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), other

Other: scholarship

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Each course focuses on different aspects of the long struggle for civil rights and efforts needed today to educate the city about Atlanta’s unique role in the civil rights movement, especially the Atlanta Student Movement. Students work in project and/or problem-based groups and advance nearly all college to career objectives. Students are exposed to archival research and oral history.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Students work closely with faculty to develop research, public speaking, collaboration, project planning and other skills. Because students in the course come from different disciplines they learn and/or enhance skills they bring to the course. Student always make a final presentation to Atlanta community members in some format, most notably the ARC and CAP.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Students see obstacles others similar to them overcame with few resources and this gives them incentives to overcome common and individual obstacles. We have high expectations for this course and the students rise to meet them.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment, Other

Other: We expect all students to succeed.
Additional Information

student engagement in course, community feedback

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

We invite members of the Atlanta community to hear and see our students’ work. They receive feedback and often praise from community members. Students feel they learn valuable information about those who laid the path for what Atlanta is today. They often say the will never walk the streets of downtown in the same way they did before the course.

Evaluation Methods

none of the above, other

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),increasing academic skill area (s),mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)

Outcome Milestones

Key Performance Indicators

numbers of students enrolled in seminars, numbers of students awarded scholarship

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
01/01/2015

Number Served
51-100

Notable Alumni

Evan Marlbrough, Founder, Georgia Youth Poll Worker Project

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), other

Other: scholarship

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Each course focuses on different aspects of the long struggle for civil rights and efforts needed today to educate the city about Atlanta’s unique role in the civil rights movement, especially the Atlanta Student Movement. Students work in project and/or problem-based groups and advance nearly all college to career objectives. Students are exposed to archival research and oral history.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Students work closely with faculty to develop research, public speaking, collaboration, project planning and other skills. Because students in the course come from different disciplines they learn and/or enhance skills they bring to the course. Student always make a final presentation to Atlanta community members in some format, most notably the ARC and CAP.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Students see obstacles others similar to them overcame with few resources and this gives them incentives to overcome common and individual obstacles. We have high expectations for this course and the students rise to meet them.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment, Other

Other: We expect all students to succeed.
Additional Information

student engagement in course, community feedback

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

We invite members of the Atlanta community to hear and see our students’ work. They receive feedback and often praise from community members. Students feel they learn valuable information about those who laid the path for what Atlanta is today. They often say the will never walk the streets of downtown in the same way they did before the course.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

none of the above, other

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),increasing academic skill area (s),mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)