Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Humanities Inclusivity Program

The Graduate School

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Frantz, Kyle
kfrantz@gsu.edu
404-413-5338

Address
55 Park Place
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Private Foundation

Overview

Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Humanities Inclusivity Program (HIP) creates a pipeline and support network for undergraduate students from underrepresented groups to enter and succeed in doctoral programs in the humanities. This two-year program offers paid research assistantships for students paired with Georgia State faculty mentors to gain the research skills and experiences they need to be successful in graduate school. HIP aims to inspire students to see themselves as faculty members at colleges and universities around the nation, then support them in the concrete steps required to achieve that goal. HIP Scholars will become role models for the next generation of humanities scholars from underrepresented groups.

Benefits

The students receive close mentoring and support, as well as paid research assistantships at the rate of $20/hour. They gain mentored research experience, participate in professional development workshops and present their research at symposia and conferences. They also receive support from faculty mentors and program staff during the process of selecting graduate programs and preparing graduate school applications. The Humanities Inclusivity Program (HIP) is housed in the Center for the Advancement of Students and Alumni (CASA). So HIP students also benefit from pre-PhD programming offered in the CASA, such as GRE preparation and recruitment events with other institutions.

Discipline Focus
Humanities

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Orientation

Race/Ethnic Group
American Indian, Black, Hispanic/ Latinx groups, Multi-racial

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
January 2019

Number Served
0-50

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The students work on mentor-sponsored research. They present at an annual CASA symposium in August and at Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference. We offer a wide range of workshops, especially in the summer. This summer our workshop topics are: Reading and Writing, Life as a Graduate Student, Emotional Intelligence, Professional Communication, Life as a Professor of the Humanities, Digital Humanities/Big Data and Preparing for Graduate School. The student’s main research and writing assignment for the summer is a literature review which is meant to help them prepare for the senior thesis or capstone project and to familiarize them with the most prominent scholars in their fields some of whom might be potential graduate advisors. The summer 2020 workshops culminate with a live virtual symposium.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

We offer intensifying mentoring and coaching, professional development and support for writing.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

We acknowledge students where they are and discuss their current situations and their short and long-term goals. We offer guidance on how to succeed through feedback on writing and through the numerous professional development workshops we offer.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

We give participants frequent opportunity to discuss their journeys and to provide feedback. Participants also present their research to their peers and to smaller and larger audiences.

Evaluation Methods

annual performance report

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)

Outcome Milestones

Our program is too new to have any such data.

Key Performance Indicators

We will be tracking admissions to graduate school

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
January 2019

Number Served
0-50

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The students work on mentor-sponsored research. They present at an annual CASA symposium in August and at Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference. We offer a wide range of workshops, especially in the summer. This summer our workshop topics are: Reading and Writing, Life as a Graduate Student, Emotional Intelligence, Professional Communication, Life as a Professor of the Humanities, Digital Humanities/Big Data and Preparing for Graduate School. The student’s main research and writing assignment for the summer is a literature review which is meant to help them prepare for the senior thesis or capstone project and to familiarize them with the most prominent scholars in their fields some of whom might be potential graduate advisors. The summer 2020 workshops culminate with a live virtual symposium.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

We offer intensifying mentoring and coaching, professional development and support for writing.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

We acknowledge students where they are and discuss their current situations and their short and long-term goals. We offer guidance on how to succeed through feedback on writing and through the numerous professional development workshops we offer.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

We give participants frequent opportunity to discuss their journeys and to provide feedback. Participants also present their research to their peers and to smaller and larger audiences.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

annual performance report

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)