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Inclusive Digital Expression & Literacy Program

School of Public Health

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Roach, Andrew
aroach@gsu.edu
404-413-8178

Norris, Spenser
snorris7@gsu.edu

Address
75 Piedmont Avenue
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

State Funding,US Department of Education (ED)

Overview

Inclusive Digital Expression and Literacy (IDEAL) at Georgia State  serves students with mild intellectual disabilities (ID). IDEAL provides access to university education and resources. IDEAL Students audit classes in creative media fields and industries (art, music production, film and television, graphic design, creative writing, etc.) and work on and off-campus internships in career fields of interest. 90% of IDEAL's students with ID are Black and come from low-income areas in ATL.

Benefits

The Inclusive Digital Expression & Literacy Program (IDEAL) provides a two-year course of study where the students audit courses offered by Georgia State colleges and academic departments, complete work-study and internship experiences and participate in a variety of extracurricular activities on campus. Students audit two courses per semester for five semesters (including 1 summer). Students audit courses from a core curriculum track (six courses) that focuses on technology use, digital/media literacy, communication skills, success in the college environment, self-determination and career development. Students will also audit an additional four elective courses to build knowledge and skills in their selected area of focus. Both core and elective courses are part of the general undergraduate curriculum, participating with peers. Upon completion of the IDEAL program, students will receive a Georgia State Certificate of Career Readiness. Students are supported in this experience by IDEAL Staff and Peer Mentors that are members of the Georgia State Community. All peer mentors, graduate research assistants and volunteers are graduate and undergraduate level Georgia State students who are paid through federal work study funding, course credit, graduate research assistantships. 60% of IDEAL staff and peer mentors identify as BIPOC.

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, Age, First Generation, Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Orientation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2017

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

De’onte Brown, Sound and Image Intern at CNN
James Freels, Writer, Compassionate Atlanta
Isaiah Branford, Intern, Creative Loafing
Nadia Osbey, Intern, O’Neill Communications Firm

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase, Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend, Development of intellectual property as specified by academic discipline

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

IDEAL hosts an undergraduate level university wide Peer Mentoring 3 credit service learning course which supports knowledge gain of working with people with intellectual disabilities, supporting autonomy, social and cognitive growth, as well as supports learning in research and evaluation.

IDEAL spearheaded a gap analysis related to industry standards and credentials and traditional special education services.

IDEAL hosts inclusion, equity and diversity trainings related to supporting people with disabilities in classrooms and internships.

IDEAL participates in nationwide research related to inclusive postsecondary education outcomes.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Many types of coaching and access and inclusion across university academic courses, networking, career panels, job skills training, social skills training and interventions, mental health counseling, positive behavior interventions and supports, access to internship and work experiences, apprenticeships

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Inherently, IDEAL at Georgia State affirms and explores disability identities and intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation. We provide mental health counseling related to identity exploration. We also train staff and volunteers in social role valorization related to encouraging the participation and inclusion of people with disabilities in valued social roles, jobs and careers. A person with a disability with the status of student is inherently affirming to a learner’s identity.

  1. Our program is committed to being anti-racist, pro-LGBTQ+, pro-neurodiversity. and anti-ableist.
  2. Our program committed to uplifting the voices of young people with disabilities and promoting our work in ways that are respectful, positive and highlight the successes, strengths and abilities of IDEAL students.
  3. Our program is committed to treating all staff and students with respect inherent in humanness.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Personalized counseling services, Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

review of student performance and outcomes

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice
Events and panels to discuss life with disability and education journey. IDEAL’s focus on digital media and expression allows access and opportunity to express individual voice in the arts fields. Evaluation methods allow participants to provide feedback regarding programming and process, newsletters, e-portfolios and student driven website are all created quarterly by students within the program

Evaluation Methods

Annual performance report, Site visit, Program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),increasing academic skill area (s),obtaining employment (industry or other sector)

Outcome Milestones

8 students with ID have completed the IDEAL program. 2. Approximately 75% were employed following program completion (prior to the COVID19 pandemic).

Key Performance Indicators

Attendance, completion of a course(s),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),completing a capstone or thesis project, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),mentoring program alumni

Key Performance Indicators
Fidelity Scales related to supported employment, employment outcomes, asset mapping, self determination scales and growth, classroom education engagement and assignment completion

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2017

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

De’onte Brown, Sound and Image Intern at CNN
James Freels, Writer, Compassionate Atlanta
Isaiah Branford, Intern, Creative Loafing
Nadia Osbey, Intern, O’Neill Communications Firm

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase, Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend, Development of intellectual property as specified by academic discipline

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

IDEAL hosts an undergraduate level university wide Peer Mentoring 3 credit service learning course which supports knowledge gain of working with people with intellectual disabilities, supporting autonomy, social and cognitive growth, as well as supports learning in research and evaluation.

IDEAL spearheaded a gap analysis related to industry standards and credentials and traditional special education services.

IDEAL hosts inclusion, equity and diversity trainings related to supporting people with disabilities in classrooms and internships.

IDEAL participates in nationwide research related to inclusive postsecondary education outcomes.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Many types of coaching and access and inclusion across university academic courses, networking, career panels, job skills training, social skills training and interventions, mental health counseling, positive behavior interventions and supports, access to internship and work experiences, apprenticeships

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Inherently, IDEAL at Georgia State affirms and explores disability identities and intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation. We provide mental health counseling related to identity exploration. We also train staff and volunteers in social role valorization related to encouraging the participation and inclusion of people with disabilities in valued social roles, jobs and careers. A person with a disability with the status of student is inherently affirming to a learner’s identity.

  1. Our program is committed to being anti-racist, pro-LGBTQ+, pro-neurodiversity. and anti-ableist.
  2. Our program committed to uplifting the voices of young people with disabilities and promoting our work in ways that are respectful, positive and highlight the successes, strengths and abilities of IDEAL students.
  3. Our program is committed to treating all staff and students with respect inherent in humanness.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Personalized counseling services, Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

review of student performance and outcomes

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice
Events and panels to discuss life with disability and education journey. IDEAL’s focus on digital media and expression allows access and opportunity to express individual voice in the arts fields. Evaluation methods allow participants to provide feedback regarding programming and process, newsletters, e-portfolios and student driven website are all created quarterly by students within the program

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

Annual performance report, Site visit, Program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),increasing academic skill area (s),obtaining employment (industry or other sector)