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Latino Leadership Pipeline Scholarship

Student Engagement

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Jiménez Chávez, Libia
ljimenezchavez@gsu.edu
404-413-2616

Address
33 Gilmer Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Building
Sparks Hall

Campus
Alpharetta, Atlanta, Clarkston, Decatur, Dunwoody, Newton

Funding

Private Foundation

Overview

The Latino Leadership Pipeline scholarship helps increase the number of students of Hispanic or Latinx heritage who enroll and complete their undergraduate degrees at Georgia State and provide mentors, internships and community service experiences to these students so they can become the leaders of the future.

Benefits

Financial support, academic support, professional development opportunities, mentoring, conference participation, study abroad, cohort model, cultural programming, payment as Student Leaders (Supplemental Instruction or LLI mentors), community service.

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity

Race/Ethnic Group
Hispanic/ Latinx groups

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2012

Number Served
101-500

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Professional development coursework: access to alumni, career-focused workshops, one-day shadowing opportunities
Professional development funding: travel to the national conferences of the following organizations: United States Hispanic Leadership Institute, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials, Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Engagement with Latinx mentors and alumni; academic, cultural, social and professional development workshops, personalized support, access to resources such as conference participation and paid positions on campus

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Acknowledging students where they are (i.e. academic, research, life) in discussions
Various types of positive reinforcement with staff, faculty and students
Conversational workshops developing group and individual identity
History and culture of the Latinx people

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events and meetings that provide opportunities for participants to discuss their journey

Evaluation Methods

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)

Outcome Milestones

# of students that persist year to year, # of students that complete degree

Key Performance Indicators

Tracking time to degree (AS and BA)

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2012

Number Served
101-500

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Professional development coursework: access to alumni, career-focused workshops, one-day shadowing opportunities
Professional development funding: travel to the national conferences of the following organizations: United States Hispanic Leadership Institute, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials, Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Engagement with Latinx mentors and alumni; academic, cultural, social and professional development workshops, personalized support, access to resources such as conference participation and paid positions on campus

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Acknowledging students where they are (i.e. academic, research, life) in discussions
Various types of positive reinforcement with staff, faculty and students
Conversational workshops developing group and individual identity
History and culture of the Latinx people

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events and meetings that provide opportunities for participants to discuss their journey

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)