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Liquid Blackness: A Research Project on Blackness and Aesthetics

College of the Arts

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate, Faculty, Graduate, Postbaccalaureate, Postdoctoral, Staff

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Raengo, Alessandra
araengo@gsu.edu

Address
25 Park Place
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding),Other Source

Overview

The liquid blackness project builds on the study of arts and artists from the Black Diaspora to explore the intersection of aesthetic theory and the most radical agenda of Black Studies. Through research projects, public events,  and online publication, it seeks to mentor the next generation of scholars of color and other scholars fully committed to the agenda of black studies, while creating a vibrant, extended, and sustainable community.

Benefits

liquid blackness has compiled an extensive archive of artist talks, masterclasses, scholarly and primary resources and digital learning tools that are increasingly employed to diversify the curricular offerings in the School of Film, Media & Theater. The goal is to allow GSU students to develop what Dr. Joyce E. King describes as “heritage knowledge,” i.e., the possibility to forge an artistic and scholarly voice centered on their own history of expressive cultures. This material has also generated scores of academic presentations and publications. The liquid blackness journal has been acquired by Duke University Press and its website is archived at the Library of Congress for its “cultural and historical significance.”

Supplemental Materials

Additional Information and Resources

Discipline Focus
Communication, Education, Humanities

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
First Generation, Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Orientation

Race/Ethnic Group
Black, Gender

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
09/01/2013

Number Served
1001-1500

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Arthur Jafa
Kahlil Joseph
Bradford Young
Haile Geerima
Jenn Nkiru

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Mentored research experience(s),Specialized center, Speaker honorarium/stipend, celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Exhibit(s)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The events celebrate the archives of black filmmaking. The archive trains emerging filmmakers allowing them to develop their artistic voice. The research group trains graduate student in cutting-edge theoretical, analytical and archival research. The online “exhibits” share with the national and international community; the website materials are routinely used in the graduate and undergraduate classroom. The Liquid Blackness journal (produced entirely at Georgia State from 2013-2017) trained graduate students in all phases of publishing editing, proofreading, etc. The events train students and volunteer in event-production, PR, etc. The group also trains in grant-writing since its events have only been partially founded by FMT or COTA. The events attract students and faculty from other institutions such as Emory, Spelman, Georgia Tech and Morehouse, thus building networks and community

Self-efficacy Emphasis

The main purpose of the liquid blackness archive of radical film making and visual arts from the Black Diaspora is to share tools for the development of new artistic and scholarly voices and to mentor the next generation of scholars of color and other scholars fully committed to the agenda of black studies.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

The liquid blackness praxis is based on the concept of “black study” (Harney & Moten, The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013), i.e., intellectual activity that experiments with forms of sociality and is more concerned with process rather than product, sharing rather than acquiring, collectivity rather than individuality.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Masterclasses with world famous filmmakers provide the students to directly discuss their own artistic voice

Evaluation Methods
Not Applicable

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),mentoring program alumni

Outcome Milestones

Previous group members are the only PhDs from the Moving Image Studies graduate program to have secured tenure track positions in Research 1 Institutions

Key Performance Indicators

Raising scholarly profile of the journal, reputation of the research group in the art and academic world

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
09/01/2013

Number Served
1001-1500

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Arthur Jafa
Kahlil Joseph
Bradford Young
Haile Geerima
Jenn Nkiru

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Mentored research experience(s),Specialized center, Speaker honorarium/stipend, celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.), Creation of materials (syllabi, templates, tool-kits, lists, resources (printed or web-based), Exhibit(s)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The events celebrate the archives of black filmmaking. The archive trains emerging filmmakers allowing them to develop their artistic voice. The research group trains graduate student in cutting-edge theoretical, analytical and archival research. The online “exhibits” share with the national and international community; the website materials are routinely used in the graduate and undergraduate classroom. The Liquid Blackness journal (produced entirely at Georgia State from 2013-2017) trained graduate students in all phases of publishing editing, proofreading, etc. The events train students and volunteer in event-production, PR, etc. The group also trains in grant-writing since its events have only been partially founded by FMT or COTA. The events attract students and faculty from other institutions such as Emory, Spelman, Georgia Tech and Morehouse, thus building networks and community

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

The main purpose of the liquid blackness archive of radical film making and visual arts from the Black Diaspora is to share tools for the development of new artistic and scholarly voices and to mentor the next generation of scholars of color and other scholars fully committed to the agenda of black studies.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

The liquid blackness praxis is based on the concept of “black study” (Harney & Moten, The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013), i.e., intellectual activity that experiments with forms of sociality and is more concerned with process rather than product, sharing rather than acquiring, collectivity rather than individuality.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Masterclasses with world famous filmmakers provide the students to directly discuss their own artistic voice

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

Not Applicable

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),mentoring program alumni