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Military Outreach

Military Outreach

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate, Faculty, Graduate, Other, Postbaccalaureate, Pre-Collegiate, Staff

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Eister, Mark
meister@gsu.edu
678-891-3097

Address
30 Courtland StreetAtlanta, GA 30303
Atlanta, GA 30303

Building
Dahlberg Hall

Campus
Alpharetta, Atlanta, Clarkston, Decatur, Dunwoody, Newton

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding), Private Foundation ,State Funding, Veterans Affairs, Other Source, Multiple Sponsors

Overview

Our Military Outreach Centers are designed to guide military-connected students (active duty, Guard, Reserve, veterans, and family members) through the application, enrollment and graduation processes, making their transition to Georgia State easy and enjoyable. By connecting them with resources on- and off-campus and providing them with the most current information about their status as a military student, the MOC provides a complete framework for their success.

Benefits

The Military Outreach Center provides veterans, active military, Guard, Reserve, spouses, dependents and survivors with support and assistance, including orientation to the campus and college learning, personal assistance, academic guidance, referrals, scholarships and professional resource support services. The MOC’s goal is to honor veterans and their families for their service and to fully assist them with an effective transition and reintegration into college and civilian life. Each of Georgia State’s six campuses is staffed by a Military Student Advocate who serves as that campus’ military advisor of record. All MSA’s are either military veterans or dependents of former military. The MSA works closely with his/her students to help them achieve academic success by ensuring they complete courses on time, remain in good academic standing, and to provide any assistance or referrals needed during the semester, whether on- or off-campus.

Supplemental Materials

Military Outreach Flyer

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, Military/Veteran Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
03/19/2012

Number Served
>10,000

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

MOC leadership regularly attend and present at local, regional and national conferences on topics related to student veterans. The MOC sponsors and/or organizes various workshops and other opportunities to student veterans on a regular basis. Students using VA benefits are afforded the opportunity to work in any of the six MOC’s and receive a VA stipend for their work serving and assisting other veterans. The MOC routinely invites speakers and demonstrators from various fields to come on campus and present or support Georgia State’s military-connected population.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

VA Work-Study; Coaching/mentoring programs (MVP-Mentoring Veterans Program); Multiple means of networking, both virtually and through our six Military Outreach Centers; Numerous workshops and other learning opportunities provided to mi/vet students.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

CAV (Calling All Veterans), where MOC staff personally call and email all known military-connected students at the start of each semester to connect with them, share what the MOC can do for them, and to answer any questions or concerns they may have; MOC recognizes mil/vet students who go above and beyond in serving their fellow students; Yearly surveys are sent to all known mil/vet students each Fall to gauge their interest, concerns, needs and wants related to their military connection.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Personalized counseling services, Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

All MOC staff receive regular updates and training related to respect and fair treatment of all; Suicide Prevention and Intervention are taught to all MOC staff and VA Work-Study students; MVP Mentoring and Training is provided to student veterans mentoring other veterans; Green Zone Training is provided to staff and faculty desiring to learn more about the military student experience.

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components
Not Applicable

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

MOC has a monthly newsletter – MOC Monthly; Most MOC’s have a large Veterans Lounge, where mil/vet students are able to freely talk and share their common experiences or concerns.

Evaluation Methods

External review/evaluation, Annual performance report, Site visit, Program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

Attendance, Presenting at a conference/symposium, Increasing academic skill area (s), Persisting through current degree program, Earning a degree, Obtaining employment (industry or other sector)

Key Performance Indicators

Number of ‘known’ enrolled, military-connected students each semester; Tabulated email/phone contacts each week, month and semester; Tabulated in-person (MOC) contacts each week, month and semester.

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
03/19/2012

Number Served
>10,000

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

MOC leadership regularly attend and present at local, regional and national conferences on topics related to student veterans. The MOC sponsors and/or organizes various workshops and other opportunities to student veterans on a regular basis. Students using VA benefits are afforded the opportunity to work in any of the six MOC’s and receive a VA stipend for their work serving and assisting other veterans. The MOC routinely invites speakers and demonstrators from various fields to come on campus and present or support Georgia State’s military-connected population.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

VA Work-Study; Coaching/mentoring programs (MVP-Mentoring Veterans Program); Multiple means of networking, both virtually and through our six Military Outreach Centers; Numerous workshops and other learning opportunities provided to mi/vet students.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

CAV (Calling All Veterans), where MOC staff personally call and email all known military-connected students at the start of each semester to connect with them, share what the MOC can do for them, and to answer any questions or concerns they may have; MOC recognizes mil/vet students who go above and beyond in serving their fellow students; Yearly surveys are sent to all known mil/vet students each Fall to gauge their interest, concerns, needs and wants related to their military connection.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals, and/or protocols), Personalized counseling services, Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

All MOC staff receive regular updates and training related to respect and fair treatment of all; Suicide Prevention and Intervention are taught to all MOC staff and VA Work-Study students; MVP Mentoring and Training is provided to student veterans mentoring other veterans; Green Zone Training is provided to staff and faculty desiring to learn more about the military student experience.

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components
Not Applicable

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

MOC has a monthly newsletter – MOC Monthly; Most MOC’s have a large Veterans Lounge, where mil/vet students are able to freely talk and share their common experiences or concerns.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

External review/evaluation, Annual performance report, Site visit, Program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

Attendance, Presenting at a conference/symposium, Increasing academic skill area (s), Persisting through current degree program, Earning a degree, Obtaining employment (industry or other sector)