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My Voice. My Participation. My Board. Training

School of Public Health

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Other

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Tucker, Molly

Address
75 Piedmont Avenue
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

State Funding

Overview

My Voice. My Participation. My Board. (MVMPMB) is a leadership training for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, who want to be effective board of director and advisory council members. MVMPMB is a three part training that helps trainees understand their strengths and gifts, board and council behaviors, and how meetings and organizations operate. Trainees also have the opportunity to network with professionals, who work within the disability community.

This program requires an application and interview. Applicants must:

  1. Be Georgia residents
  2. Identify as a person with an intellectual or developmental disability
  3. Be 21 or older
  4. Have previously participated in an advocacy training program

Benefits

  1. Awareness of one’s gifts and talents
  2. Awareness of leadership opportunities
  3. Introduction to effective communication strategies
  4. Understanding of how to be an advocate and community leader
  5. Relationship building with peers, peer mentors and professionals
  6. Continued education and leadership development

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
03/01/2013

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Liz Weintraub

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Committee/council/group/advisory board/task force, Speaker honorarium/stipend, celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.), Accommodations (disability)/assistance (employee, staff), Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

This training promotes leadership for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities by providing an annual cohort based 6-day training.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

The first two days is spent exploring each individuals gifts and talents, supporting them in creating an elevator speech and understanding how to use your gifts as a leader. The training also provides opportunities for individuals to network with leaders in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities. There are continuing education and networking opportunities available for all alumni throughout the year.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

  1. This training starts off with exploring gifts and strengths using VIA Character Strengths.
  2. Discussion are had around what individuals gifts and strengths are and how to use those in a leadership role.
  3. There is also a section on accommodations and how to think through what accommodations are needed and the best way to ask for those.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

  1. Trainees are engaged in conversations related to their personal experiences and why it is important that “nothing be about us without us.”
  2. This training is co-facilitated by individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, who have graduated from the program. Co-facilitators not only share their experiences as leaders, but also lead conversations about identity and advocacy within the disability community.
  3. My Voice. My Participation. My Board. was developed because of the lack of disability representation on boards and councils throughout Georgia. By training individuals to serve as effective board and council members, we hope to eliminate the prevalence of tokenism.

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, course/curricula content changes

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

Attendance, Completion of a course(s), Mentoring program alumni, Other

Other: a position on an advisory council or board of directors

Outcome Milestones

As of December 2019:

  • Seven cohorts
  • 62 total graduates
  • 39 alumni are serving on a board of directors or advisory council
  • 49 alumni have a leadership role within an organization
  • 51% of alumni identify as Black, Latinx, or Asian

Key Performance Indicators

Event Attendance, Satisfaction Surveys, Self-Assessments, Focus Groups, and Interviews

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
03/01/2013

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Liz Weintraub

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Committee/council/group/advisory board/task force, Speaker honorarium/stipend, celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.), Accommodations (disability)/assistance (employee, staff), Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

This training promotes leadership for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities by providing an annual cohort based 6-day training.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

The first two days is spent exploring each individuals gifts and talents, supporting them in creating an elevator speech and understanding how to use your gifts as a leader. The training also provides opportunities for individuals to network with leaders in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities. There are continuing education and networking opportunities available for all alumni throughout the year.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

  1. This training starts off with exploring gifts and strengths using VIA Character Strengths.
  2. Discussion are had around what individuals gifts and strengths are and how to use those in a leadership role.
  3. There is also a section on accommodations and how to think through what accommodations are needed and the best way to ask for those.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

  1. Trainees are engaged in conversations related to their personal experiences and why it is important that “nothing be about us without us.”
  2. This training is co-facilitated by individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, who have graduated from the program. Co-facilitators not only share their experiences as leaders, but also lead conversations about identity and advocacy within the disability community.
  3. My Voice. My Participation. My Board. was developed because of the lack of disability representation on boards and councils throughout Georgia. By training individuals to serve as effective board and council members, we hope to eliminate the prevalence of tokenism.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, course/curricula content changes

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

Attendance, Completion of a course(s), Mentoring program alumni, Other

Other: a position on an advisory council or board of directors