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NSF S-STEM Scholarship Program

College of Arts and Sciences

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate, Graduate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Mooring, Suazette
smooring@gsu.edu
404-413-5527

Address
24 Peachtree Center Avenue
Atlanta, GA 30303

Building
Science Annex

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Overview

The S-STEM Scholarship program at Georgia State University will provide financial, academic and professional development support to Juniors and Seniors Majoring in Biology, Chemistry or Neuroscience. Scholarships of up to $5,000 per year will be based on financial need and academic potential. Students must meet eligibility requirements, including demonstrated financial need. Scholarships are renewable for a second year and for the first year of MS degree at GSU

Benefits

The program will provide a comprehensive set of activities and opportunities for development of academic and research skills, with the goal of increasing student self-efficacy. Students will engage in cohort-building activities such as a separate orientation specifically for them and text-based communication within the cohort. They will also participate in faculty mentoring, career planning through creation of Individual Development Plans, enhanced research opportunities, seminar courses and workshops and facilitation of industry connections.

Student receive up to $5000 in scholarship per year based on FASFA unmet need.

Supplemental Materials

STEM Scholarships Award Abstract

Discipline Focus
Life Sciences, Neuroscience, Physical Sciences

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
03/01/2017

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

Antoinette Charles, B.S., Nueroscience
Titilope Akinwe, B.S., Neuroscience
Anne Jean, B.S., Chemistry
Amani Mallory, B.S., MIS Biomedical Enterprise
Chazz Jordan, B.S., Biology

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

All scholars are expected to be involved in research with a faculty member . Workshops and courses include a seminar course that includes: Drafting Individual Development Plans, Metacognition training, How to find a summer research experience, writing personal statements, scientific poster development; writing personal statements and resumes, how to give an elevator speech. A separate how to give a research talk workshop series is also given

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Mentoring and networking with cohort, research experiences, professional development, presentation and poster preparation workshops, Individual development plans; visit to industry; various panel discussions

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

1. Scholars get to share there research with mentor and cohorts during meetings; 2. encouraging students to explore several opportunities and career options;

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols)

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

1. Events for participants to discuss their success in summer and research experiences and to discuss their research. 2. At graduation scholars meet with and evaluator for exit interviews; Scholars provide feedback through surveys each year.

Evaluation Methods

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)

Outcome Milestones

1. # of student completing program with BS degrees in STEM -15; 2. Number entering the STEM workforce or graduate/professional programs – 15

Key Performance Indicators

# completing BS degrees in STEM and # entering the STEM workforce and # entering graduate or professional schools

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
03/01/2017

Number Served
0-50

Notable Alumni

Antoinette Charles, B.S., Nueroscience
Titilope Akinwe, B.S., Neuroscience
Anne Jean, B.S., Chemistry
Amani Mallory, B.S., MIS Biomedical Enterprise
Chazz Jordan, B.S., Biology

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

All scholars are expected to be involved in research with a faculty member . Workshops and courses include a seminar course that includes: Drafting Individual Development Plans, Metacognition training, How to find a summer research experience, writing personal statements, scientific poster development; writing personal statements and resumes, how to give an elevator speech. A separate how to give a research talk workshop series is also given

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Mentoring and networking with cohort, research experiences, professional development, presentation and poster preparation workshops, Individual development plans; visit to industry; various panel discussions

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

1. Scholars get to share there research with mentor and cohorts during meetings; 2. encouraging students to explore several opportunities and career options;

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols)

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

1. Events for participants to discuss their success in summer and research experiences and to discuss their research. 2. At graduation scholars meet with and evaluator for exit interviews; Scholars provide feedback through surveys each year.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)