Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Ph.D. Project

J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate, Faculty, Graduate, Postbaccalaureate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Brewington, Adenike
abrewington1@gsu.edu
4044137070

Address
35 Broad Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Private Foundation

Overview

The goal of the PhD Project is to increase diversity in the business school faculty pipeline. Robinson has supported the PhD Project since its inception by continuing the renewal of the membership for participating institutions, attending conferences and recruitment events, connecting Project candidates with current students and faculty to discuss their research interests, providing personalized admission advisement sessions and using the applicant database to recruit URM to the PhD program.

Benefits

Potential funding from KPMG
Access to the national PhD Project network/mentorship, which includes Robinson PhD alumni as well as current faculty
One-on-one admissions advisement session with Robinson
Research based conversations with current faculty and students prior to the start of the application cycle
Application fee waiver
Admitted students receive an assistantship, which includes a stipend and full tuition waiver
Students receive access to the Robinson PhD Fellows organization, which includes training sessions to include: IRB training, academic publications, job market preparation, mental health, professional development, dissertation writing, etc.)
Students receive conference travel support
Faculty/student members have access to the national PhD Project network, which holds conferences to include: diversity, women of color, student application preparation, AACSB dean’s conference, HBCU conferences, research symposiums and the annual PhD Project conf. and recruitment fair.

Supplemental Materials

Diversity Survey

Discipline Focus
Business Management

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity

Race/Ethnic Group
American Indian, Black, Hispanic/ Latinx groups, Other, To clarify, the PhD Program does not provide formal specialized programming; however, the program will support all students, including URMs, in any areas of academic deficiencies by creating a tailored program of study to supplement the student’s current knowledge. The PhD Project does provide a specialized network of support for URMs.

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
04/01/1994

Number Served
1001-1500

Notable Alumni

Pennywell, Gwendolyn, Ph.D., Interim Asst. Dean Univ of S. AL
Kvasny, Lynette, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Penn State Univ
Bettis-Outland, Harriette, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Univ of W. FL
Napier, Nanette, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Gwinnett College
Brown, Brian, Ph.D., Professor, VA Commonwealth Univ

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Application fee waiver, Full tuition waiver and stipend, Conference funding support
One-to-one mentoring
Research development seminars focused on job market papers and academic journal publications
Training sessions to include: IRB training, academic publications, job market and CV preparation, mental health, professional development, dissertation writing and preparing for comprehensive exams
Distinguish scholar research series for credit, Brown Bag seminar series to present research, Teaching seminar for credit
The interdisciplinary Theory Development course introduces exercises on the role of problem formulation in the research process; through these exercises, students learn how their choices related to situating, grounding, diagnosing and solving problems influence the specification and motivation of the research question. Also, introduced exercises on leveraging the role of context, multilevel perspectives and time in the development of variance and process studies.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Collaborate with other schools to encourage networking outside of the department. Uses a faculty/student matching model (students meet at least three faculty members). Students and faculty have input on appropriate match for mentorship. Get students involved with faculty early on to foster long-term relationships. Flexibility to change the student/faculty pairing if it is not working. Attend seminars with students from other institutions to broaden scope and widen network.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Review process includes accomplishments of meaningful work, areas of improvements and progress needed, Early identification helps prevent problems, PhD Fellows student sessions to help with research development, multi semester meetings to discuss research preparation, brown bag seminars and research workshops and PhD poster sessions.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

PhD Fellows social events (cross disciplinary) Mentoring sessions – student and faculty voices both important Notifications to highlight successes of current students and alumni Frequent review of student progress

Evaluation Methods

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, site visit

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),publishing a scholarly work as defined by an academic discipline, presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)

Outcome Milestones

Nearly 20 UMR have completed the program and earned the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and are affiliated with the PhD Project

Key Performance Indicators

# of students who have completed coursework within 2-3 year window # of students who have completed comps within 3 years # of students who form a committee and complete a proposal defense within a 1-2 years of completing comps # of students who complete the program within 5-6 years # of students with a publication # of students who placed at a Carnegie high research institution

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
04/01/1994

Number Served
1001-1500

Notable Alumni

Pennywell, Gwendolyn, Ph.D., Interim Asst. Dean Univ of S. AL
Kvasny, Lynette, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Penn State Univ
Bettis-Outland, Harriette, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Univ of W. FL
Napier, Nanette, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Gwinnett College
Brown, Brian, Ph.D., Professor, VA Commonwealth Univ

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Application fee waiver, Full tuition waiver and stipend, Conference funding support
One-to-one mentoring
Research development seminars focused on job market papers and academic journal publications
Training sessions to include: IRB training, academic publications, job market and CV preparation, mental health, professional development, dissertation writing and preparing for comprehensive exams
Distinguish scholar research series for credit, Brown Bag seminar series to present research, Teaching seminar for credit
The interdisciplinary Theory Development course introduces exercises on the role of problem formulation in the research process; through these exercises, students learn how their choices related to situating, grounding, diagnosing and solving problems influence the specification and motivation of the research question. Also, introduced exercises on leveraging the role of context, multilevel perspectives and time in the development of variance and process studies.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Collaborate with other schools to encourage networking outside of the department. Uses a faculty/student matching model (students meet at least three faculty members). Students and faculty have input on appropriate match for mentorship. Get students involved with faculty early on to foster long-term relationships. Flexibility to change the student/faculty pairing if it is not working. Attend seminars with students from other institutions to broaden scope and widen network.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Review process includes accomplishments of meaningful work, areas of improvements and progress needed, Early identification helps prevent problems, PhD Fellows student sessions to help with research development, multi semester meetings to discuss research preparation, brown bag seminars and research workshops and PhD poster sessions.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

PhD Fellows social events (cross disciplinary) Mentoring sessions – student and faculty voices both important Notifications to highlight successes of current students and alumni Frequent review of student progress

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, site visit

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),publishing a scholarly work as defined by an academic discipline, presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)