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Project ACHiEVE (TRiO Student Support Services Decatur Campus)

Student Engagement

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Pernell, Calaph
cpernell@gsu.edu
678-891-2793

Address
3251 Panthersville Road
Decatur, GA 30034

Campus
Decatur

Funding

US Department of Education (ED)

Overview

The Student Support Services (SSS) program provides support services to first-generation, low-income and/or students with disabilities. The goal of SSS program is to increase the college retention and graduation rates of its participants and is based upon the belief that all students, regardless of age, family background, learning style, or presence of a disability, should have equal opportunity to reach their full personal, academic and career potential.

Benefits

TRIO SSS aims to increase and provide opportunities for academic development, assist students with basic college requirements and to motivate students toward the successful completion of their postsecondary education. Eligible students may receive tutoring, cursory academic advisement and coaching, financial/economic literacy, information on both the full range of student financial aid programs and benefits and resources for locating public and private scholarships, assistance in completing financial aid applications, college tours, college to career preparation and academic and success workshops. Participants may also receive individualized counseling for personal, career and academic information, exposure to cultural events and academic programs not usually available and mentorship. These services, which are provided at no cost to students, all promote the progression and academic success of students.

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, First Generation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/2001

Number Served
1501-2000

Notable Alumni

Dr. Kofi Amanquah, Ph.D., Pharmacist
Ray Hill, M.A. Community Director at Morehouse College
Timothy Carter, MBA, Team Lead U.S. Department of Commerce
Jaleesa Bass, MBA, Compensation Analyst
Sequaya Sims, B.S. CLC Administrative Coordinator

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase)), Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The project is evidence-based, incorporating research-based Academic Success Coaching and interventions designed to increase the development of non-cognitive skills, to promote the success of our students. The project hosts an interconnected series of academic, personal and social support services events and workshops. Some of the events and workshops are “Scholarships and You,” “Learning Styles and You!,” “Completing the FAFSA,” “Paw Talk,” “Stress Management,” “Money Conference,” “Leadership Conference,” “Thank Goodness I Finished Social,” “Math Anxiety,” “Money Matters: Scholarship,” “Career Assessments,” “Rope Challenge Course Program,” “Academic Success Tips for Finals,” “Visualizing your Success: Vision Board,” “Entrepreneurship Symposium,” “Business Etiquette Dinner,” “Resume and Cover Letter Building,” and “TRIO Day of Volunteering.” Staff is exposed to various local, regional and national conferences, webinars and meetings for professional development opportunities.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

The SSS Project provides orientation, panel discussions and round table discussions to address unique concerns that first-generation and low-income college students face while attending college. Participants with the same social class background shares their experiences of adjusting to college life. Some topics discussed are Attitude and Behaviors for Success, Goal Setting, Note and Test Taking Skills, Learning Styles, Classroom Etiquette, Study Groups and Discovering Campus Resources.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Students are required to complete the FDIC Money Smarts, Jung Typology Indicator (JOTI) and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) assessments to highlight and discuss results during the intake, panel discussion, coaching sessions or success workshops. The Academic Coach used the results of the assessment to identify participant’s weaknesses and strengths, encourage participation in success workshops, develop an academic plan for success and connect students to campus resources.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Personalized counseling services, Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Participants completes regular evaluation after each service or event to survey the usefulness of information shared. The program annually celebrates the participation of its student body, highlights semester accomplishments and acknowledge proud graduates and outstanding achievers during the “TGIF” social and “Showcase of Excellence” ceremony. Participants are encouraged during events to give testimonial of program contributions. Participants also shares success stories during orientations.

Evaluation Methods

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning a degree, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

The SSS Project serves 160 funded number of students with the following outcomes: 86% rates in persistence, 87% rate in good academic standing, 54% rate in new participants served graduate with an associate degree, 37% rate in new participates served graduate with an associate and transfer to a 4-yr institution.

Key Performance Indicators

The SSS Project ACHiEVE key performance indicators: Funded to Serve, Persistence Rate, Good Academic Standing, Associates Degree or Certificate, Associates Degree and Transfer, # receiving academic tutoring, # received advice and assistance in postsecondary course selection, # received education/counseling to improve financial and economic literacy, # receiving information in applying for Federal Student Aid, # receiving assistance in completing and applying for Federal Student Aid, # receiving

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/2001

Number Served
1501-2000

Notable Alumni

Dr. Kofi Amanquah, Ph.D., Pharmacist
Ray Hill, M.A. Community Director at Morehouse College
Timothy Carter, MBA, Team Lead U.S. Department of Commerce
Jaleesa Bass, MBA, Compensation Analyst
Sequaya Sims, B.S. CLC Administrative Coordinator

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase)), Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The project is evidence-based, incorporating research-based Academic Success Coaching and interventions designed to increase the development of non-cognitive skills, to promote the success of our students. The project hosts an interconnected series of academic, personal and social support services events and workshops. Some of the events and workshops are “Scholarships and You,” “Learning Styles and You!,” “Completing the FAFSA,” “Paw Talk,” “Stress Management,” “Money Conference,” “Leadership Conference,” “Thank Goodness I Finished Social,” “Math Anxiety,” “Money Matters: Scholarship,” “Career Assessments,” “Rope Challenge Course Program,” “Academic Success Tips for Finals,” “Visualizing your Success: Vision Board,” “Entrepreneurship Symposium,” “Business Etiquette Dinner,” “Resume and Cover Letter Building,” and “TRIO Day of Volunteering.” Staff is exposed to various local, regional and national conferences, webinars and meetings for professional development opportunities.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

The SSS Project provides orientation, panel discussions and round table discussions to address unique concerns that first-generation and low-income college students face while attending college. Participants with the same social class background shares their experiences of adjusting to college life. Some topics discussed are Attitude and Behaviors for Success, Goal Setting, Note and Test Taking Skills, Learning Styles, Classroom Etiquette, Study Groups and Discovering Campus Resources.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Students are required to complete the FDIC Money Smarts, Jung Typology Indicator (JOTI) and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) assessments to highlight and discuss results during the intake, panel discussion, coaching sessions or success workshops. The Academic Coach used the results of the assessment to identify participant’s weaknesses and strengths, encourage participation in success workshops, develop an academic plan for success and connect students to campus resources.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Personalized counseling services, Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Participants completes regular evaluation after each service or event to survey the usefulness of information shared. The program annually celebrates the participation of its student body, highlights semester accomplishments and acknowledge proud graduates and outstanding achievers during the “TGIF” social and “Showcase of Excellence” ceremony. Participants are encouraged during events to give testimonial of program contributions. Participants also shares success stories during orientations.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning a degree, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)