Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Social Justice Certificate Program

College of Arts and Sciences

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
N/A

Contact Information
Desmond Goss
dgoss5@gsu.edu
404-413-6533

Address
38 Peachtree Center Avenue
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

The Certificate’s primary objectives are to: 1) provide specialized curricula to strengthen the candidacy of Program graduates for post-graduate professional activities concerned with social justice, 2) provide opportunities to apply course material via experience-based active learning activities and 3) form a comprehensive and interdisciplinary field of social justice from the relevant – but isolated – courses in discrete university departments.

Benefits

Each student earns a program certificate and is offered opportunities for professional development.

Supplemental Materials

Social Justice Certificate Proposal

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, Age, First Generation, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
07/01/2020

Number Served
0-50

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Program cornerstone courses require students engage in and with social science research.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Program requires students create and operate social justice campaigns in their communities.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Program defines social justice in terms of centering and supporting oppressed communities.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Program participants are encouraged to speak on their experiences in relation to course material. Program participants also are asked to evaluate the program during and after matriculation. Program website will spotlight program participant achievements.

Evaluation Methods

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)

Outcome Milestones

# of students who complete program

Key Performance Indicators

a. Students will demonstrate knowledge of conceptual and practical approaches to Social Justice. b. Students will demonstrate knowledge of social problems from an intersectional perspective. C. Students will gain practical skills and experience in collecting social science data using sociological research methodologies.

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
07/01/2020

Number Served
0-50

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

Program cornerstone courses require students engage in and with social science research.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Program requires students create and operate social justice campaigns in their communities.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Program defines social justice in terms of centering and supporting oppressed communities.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Program participants are encouraged to speak on their experiences in relation to course material. Program participants also are asked to evaluate the program during and after matriculation. Program website will spotlight program participant achievements.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning acceptance to graduate school, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty),mentoring program alumni, persistence in research (e.g., applying to other research programs, completing other mentored research experiences)