Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

Social Justice Summer

Student Engagement

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate, Graduate, Postbaccalaureate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
McDonough, Ellin
emcdonough@gsu.edu

Address
55 Gilmer Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

Social Justice Summer is a series of events sponsored by SCE that explores current issues affecting our world and community. Specifically, this summer's topics focus on local non-profit org responses to racial injustice and police brutality, CO-VID, refugee assistance and voting. Students will leave each session with ideas on how to become actively engaged in issues that matter.

Benefits

Students will leave with:

1. Ideas on how to become actively engaged in social justice issues
2. a connection to non-profit partners that work and advocate for diverse populations

Supplemental Materials

Social Justice Summer Events

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/06/2020

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Keith Strickland, Making The Transition
Ryan Downey, East Atlanta Kids Club
Louisa Fortin, Atlanta Food Bank
Susan McDaniel, Friends of Refugees
Mary Helen O’Conner, Community Engagement- Clarkston

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

“…”

Self-efficacy Emphasis

The program encourages/empowers students to become civically engaged. The panelists serve as examples of engaged citizens and deliver information on how to get involved.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs
Not Applicable

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues)

Participant Empowerment

None of the above

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Panel discussions are 50% of the program with the remainder serving as audience feedback and Q&A

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance

Outcome Milestones

“…”

Key Performance Indicators

Survey ratings

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/06/2020

Number Served
51-100

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Keith Strickland, Making The Transition
Ryan Downey, East Atlanta Kids Club
Louisa Fortin, Atlanta Food Bank
Susan McDaniel, Friends of Refugees
Mary Helen O’Conner, Community Engagement- Clarkston

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

“…”

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

The program encourages/empowers students to become civically engaged. The panelists serve as examples of engaged citizens and deliver information on how to get involved.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?
Not Applicable

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues)

Participant Empowerment

None of the above

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Panel discussions are 50% of the program with the remainder serving as audience feedback and Q&A

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance