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Sources of Urban Educational Excellence Conference

Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence, College of Education and Human Development

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate, Faculty, Graduate, Other, Postbaccalaureate, Postdoctoral, Pre-Collegiate, Staff

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Salter, Dana
dsalter@gsu.edu

Address
30 Pryor Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Other Source

Overview

For the past 15 years, the Sources Conference has served as a critical space for the discussion and dissemination of solutions to the challenges facing urban education in the southeast United States and beyond. The conference serves as a gathering space for Dr. Alonzo A. Crim’s Community of Believers; a collection of individuals from various fields who have committed themselves to working across professional silos in an effort to cultivate and sustain excellence in urban schools.

Benefits

1. Highlight solutions-focused education research
2. Introduce GSU and surrounding community members to speakers, artists, thinkers, business leaders and activists who are not usually included in higher education settings and conversations
3. Gathering sport for Dr Alonzo A. Crim’s ‘Community of Believers’: all in the community who want to create excellent education opportunities for our students. This include parents, CEOs, construction, arts, data scientists, public health, etc.
4. Provide space for reflection and conversations about tough education related topics in a nurturing, thoughtful, engaging and diverse perspective environment.

Supplemental Materials

Sources 2019 Program

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, Age, First Generation, Gender, Other, Political Ideology, Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Orientation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Other, The Sources Confereance is a space for all racial/ethnic minority groups to present work, collaborate and connect

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/20/2005

Number Served
3501-4000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Asa Hilliard III, Ph D
Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, Ph.D
Ayoka Chenzira, Ph.D
Keynote Panel: Condace Pressley, Leroy Chapman Jr.; Malena Cunningham Anderson, Lonnie King, Angela Tuck
Committee on Teaching About the United Nations

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements), Exhibit(s), Other

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

2018 Sources Conference workshop description: Workshop: It’s About Visibility In the Community: Rallying the Village to Promote STEM Education -room 304 This presentation shares a college seminar course – It takes A Village to Train A Scientist (ITAV) – developed to engage undergraduate students in the power of positive change by promoting multicultural education within the context of their coursework. ITAV was a partnership between Georgia State University (Georgia State) and Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy (CSK) to promote STEM education, visibility and collaboration of entities across the metro Atlanta community. This interactive presentation will include many of the stakeholders and the ways in which college students acted as advocates and allies to support the STEM initiatives of a 6-12 school serving young women of color.

Natalie King, Laura Pena Telfer, Eulonda Washington, Morgan Scout, Kalil Garrett, Miala Wilkerson, Dalila Wright, Jahmya Phillips, Christine Mgbam,

Self-efficacy Emphasis
Not Applicable

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

2018 Sources Conference workshop description: Workshop: It’s About Visibility In the Community: Rallying the Village to Promote STEM Education -room 304 This presentation shares a college seminar course – It takes A Village to Train A Scientist (ITAV) – developed to engage undergraduate students in the power of positive change by promoting multicultural education within the context of their coursework. ITAV was a partnership between Georgia State University (Georgia State) and Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy (CSK) to promote STEM education, visibility and collaboration of entities across the metro Atlanta community. This interactive presentation will include many of the stakeholders and the ways in which college students acted as advocates and allies to support the STEM initiatives of a 6-12 school serving young women of color.

Natalie King, Laura Pena Telfer, Eulonda Washington, Morgan Scout, Kalil Garrett, Miala Wilkerson, Dalila Wright, Jahmya Phillips, Christine Mgbam,

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment, Other

Other: Through presentations, conversations, keynotes/talks, naming and addressing a range of barriers to a range of inclusions that our participants want to discuss

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

1. Conference themes/RFP always include threads/opportunities for participants to connect their lived experiences to the theme and present that work. 2. Each presenter, their bio and their work is highlighted on the conference website. 3. Post-conference evaluation provides ample same for participants to anonymously reflect on their experience and share how we can improve.

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),Other

Other: Building professional networks; engaging with new voices and ideas that you don’t normally hear; seeing and engaging with the range of great research and ideas coming from across Georgia State community

Outcome Milestones

“…”

Key Performance Indicators

Attendance; Post conference survey data

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
01/20/2005

Number Served
3501-4000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Asa Hilliard III, Ph D
Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, Ph.D
Ayoka Chenzira, Ph.D
Keynote Panel: Condace Pressley, Leroy Chapman Jr.; Malena Cunningham Anderson, Lonnie King, Angela Tuck
Committee on Teaching About the United Nations

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Dissemination/communication of policy, newsletter, brief, common definitions, web-based diversity, equity and/or inclusion statements, Community outreach (e.g., townhall, alumni engagement, meetings to gauge community perception or campus constituents, movements), Exhibit(s), Other

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

2018 Sources Conference workshop description: Workshop: It’s About Visibility In the Community: Rallying the Village to Promote STEM Education -room 304 This presentation shares a college seminar course – It takes A Village to Train A Scientist (ITAV) – developed to engage undergraduate students in the power of positive change by promoting multicultural education within the context of their coursework. ITAV was a partnership between Georgia State University (Georgia State) and Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy (CSK) to promote STEM education, visibility and collaboration of entities across the metro Atlanta community. This interactive presentation will include many of the stakeholders and the ways in which college students acted as advocates and allies to support the STEM initiatives of a 6-12 school serving young women of color.

Natalie King, Laura Pena Telfer, Eulonda Washington, Morgan Scout, Kalil Garrett, Miala Wilkerson, Dalila Wright, Jahmya Phillips, Christine Mgbam,

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?
Not Applicable

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

2018 Sources Conference workshop description: Workshop: It’s About Visibility In the Community: Rallying the Village to Promote STEM Education -room 304 This presentation shares a college seminar course – It takes A Village to Train A Scientist (ITAV) – developed to engage undergraduate students in the power of positive change by promoting multicultural education within the context of their coursework. ITAV was a partnership between Georgia State University (Georgia State) and Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy (CSK) to promote STEM education, visibility and collaboration of entities across the metro Atlanta community. This interactive presentation will include many of the stakeholders and the ways in which college students acted as advocates and allies to support the STEM initiatives of a 6-12 school serving young women of color.

Natalie King, Laura Pena Telfer, Eulonda Washington, Morgan Scout, Kalil Garrett, Miala Wilkerson, Dalila Wright, Jahmya Phillips, Christine Mgbam,

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment, Other

Other: Through presentations, conversations, keynotes/talks, naming and addressing a range of barriers to a range of inclusions that our participants want to discuss

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Publication opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentoring is not used in our program

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

1. Conference themes/RFP always include threads/opportunities for participants to connect their lived experiences to the theme and present that work. 2. Each presenter, their bio and their work is highlighted on the conference website. 3. Post-conference evaluation provides ample same for participants to anonymously reflect on their experience and share how we can improve.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),Other

Other: Building professional networks; engaging with new voices and ideas that you don’t normally hear; seeing and engaging with the range of great research and ideas coming from across Georgia State community