Use our Diversity Database Update Form to submit changes to your program.

The Center for Urban Language Teaching & Research

College of the Arts

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate, Other, Pre-Collegiate, Staff

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Dr. William Nichols
wnichols@gsu.edu
404-413-6390

Address
85 Park Place N.E.
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding),US Department of Education (ED),Other Source,Multiple Sponsors

Overview

The Center for Urban Language Teaching & Research, CULTR is the first LRC in the Southeastern U.S.. Our mission is to enhance the global skills opportunities of urban and underrepresented learners and educators. Our slogan, “Languages for all”, underscores our commitment to providing access to fulfilling language programs and meaningful professional development. CULTR is guided by its core values of access, advocacy, outreach & research.

Benefits

Guided by its core values, CULTR’s initiatives fall into four central objectives: professional development, career readiness, advocacy, research. Regarding professional development, CULTR strives to increase learning and growth opportunities for language teachers and build communities of practice. World Language teachers benefit from in-person and on-line professional development workshops that center around best practices, as well as affecting issues related to encouragement, inspiration and a sense of community as they are related to teacher retention. Students of World Languages benefit from teachers who are prepared, motivated, competent and adept at effective use of technology in the classroom. Teacher retention benefits the students, school, community and teaching profession at large with teachers who are engaged in professional learning and exchanging best practices with their peers to meet the 21st century educational needs of their students.

Supplemental Materials

CULTR Impact

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2014

Number Served
3001-3500

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

1- Mapping the DLI Opportunity Gap. CULTR will partner with the Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence at Georgia State to create an interactive map of DLI schools and programs. By highlighting the lack of availability of DLI programs to the most underserved communities, the Centers will create data and research to inform curriculum around culturally responsive DLI programming/instruction and action to address the opportunity gap. 2- Developing a computerized assessment battery of pragmatic competence in Chinese as a second language- Dr. Shuai Li. This multi-year project aims to develop and validate an assessment battery for testing L2 Chinese pragmatics for college students. 3- Linguascaping the school: A deep mapping project for urban linguistic landscape -Dr. Hakyoon Lee. This project explores how the concept of Linguistic Landscape (LL) is employed as a pedagogical tool in multilingual local k-12 school contexts, to investigate learners’ understanding of multilingualism.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Teacher Professional Development Workshops

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

CULTR has created a unique identity around serving the needs of all students (“Languages for all”) and the communities they represent by helping to provide empowering language learning opportunities as part of 21st-Century global education. World Languages Day is a global career expo connecting high school and college students to panelists and exhibitors with diverse backgrounds to learn about the value of language learning and cultural competence from a wide variety of industries.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Other

Other: Panelist who speak from their own voice and identity about being viewed and treated as the "other".

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders)

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events that provide opportunities for participants to discuss their journey. Evaluation methods to allow participates to provide feedback. Creation of newsletters and/or journals to highlight participants

Evaluation Methods

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, site visit, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

N/A

Key Performance Indicators

https://cultr.gsu.edu/impact/ https://cultr.gsu.edu/world-languages-day/

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
08/01/2014

Number Served
3001-3500

Notable Alumni

Research Components and Activities

Mentored research experience(s), Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

1- Mapping the DLI Opportunity Gap. CULTR will partner with the Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence at Georgia State to create an interactive map of DLI schools and programs. By highlighting the lack of availability of DLI programs to the most underserved communities, the Centers will create data and research to inform curriculum around culturally responsive DLI programming/instruction and action to address the opportunity gap. 2- Developing a computerized assessment battery of pragmatic competence in Chinese as a second language- Dr. Shuai Li. This multi-year project aims to develop and validate an assessment battery for testing L2 Chinese pragmatics for college students. 3- Linguascaping the school: A deep mapping project for urban linguistic landscape -Dr. Hakyoon Lee. This project explores how the concept of Linguistic Landscape (LL) is employed as a pedagogical tool in multilingual local k-12 school contexts, to investigate learners’ understanding of multilingualism.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Teacher Professional Development Workshops

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

CULTR has created a unique identity around serving the needs of all students (“Languages for all”) and the communities they represent by helping to provide empowering language learning opportunities as part of 21st-Century global education. World Languages Day is a global career expo connecting high school and college students to panelists and exhibitors with diverse backgrounds to learn about the value of language learning and cultural competence from a wide variety of industries.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Other

Other: Panelist who speak from their own voice and identity about being viewed and treated as the "other".

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Feeder pathways (e.g. existing partnerships with programs at similar or next level of the academic pipeline), Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders)

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Events that provide opportunities for participants to discuss their journey. Evaluation methods to allow participates to provide feedback. Creation of newsletters and/or journals to highlight participants

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, site visit, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),conducting research (e.g., course-based, laboratory-based, apprentice-based, discovery-based),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),presenting at a conference/symposium, increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, completing a capstone or thesis project, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)