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The Gender & Sexuality Resource Center

Multicultural Center, University-Wide

Multicultural Programming

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Britto, William
wbritto@gsu.edu
404-413-1584

Address
55 Gilmer Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

Institutional Funding (e.g., President's Office, Provost Office, College or Academic Unit, Departmental Funding)

Overview

The Gender and Sexuality Resource Center (GSRC) is an extension of the Multicultural Center and focuses on providing services, resources and intentional support for students identifying as or connecting to LGBTQIQA and varying gender identities. Located on the Atlanta Campus in Student Center East, the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center is on the second floor with its entrance through the Multicultural Center’s main lobby, Suite 206. The GSRC provides services including programming, workshops,

Benefits

Community Building
Identity Awareness
Allyship
Access to mentors and mentees
Safe Space
Cultural Competence

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Business Management, Communication, Computer & Information Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities, Library Sciences, Life Sciences, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Not discipline specific (University-Wide), Physical Sciences, Professional, Social Sciences

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, Age, First Generation, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
American Indian, Asian, Black, Gender, Hispanic/ Latinx groups, Multi-racial, Pacific Islander, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiians

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
07/01/2019

Number Served
501-1000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Dr. Jeffrey Coleman
Dr. Darryl Holloman

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Specialized center, Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The center hosts workshops such as Safe Zone as well as programming around gender and sexuality minorities.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Workshops, discussion programs, identity based events

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

The center hosts workshops such as Safe Zone as well as programming around gender and sexuality minorities.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Through discussion programming and events as well as newsletters

Evaluation Methods

average attendance to events, annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance

Outcome Milestones

Building community, increased attendance, identity development

Key Performance Indicators

Survey ratings

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 2: Multicultural Programming

Established
07/01/2019

Number Served
501-1000

Notable Leaders, Stakeholders, or Speakers

Dr. Jeffrey Coleman
Dr. Darryl Holloman

Research Routines, Responsibilities and Activities

Specialized center, Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ training/coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, modules, professional development etiquette, facilitated discussion, panel, summit, educational programming, speaker series), Cultural competency training (workshop, certificate, course), Celebrations of diverse groups (e.g. Black history, Asian American/ Pacific Islander Heritage, etc.)

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The center hosts workshops such as Safe Zone as well as programming around gender and sexuality minorities.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Workshops, discussion programs, identity based events

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

The center hosts workshops such as Safe Zone as well as programming around gender and sexuality minorities.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Pedagogical practices (e.g. multicultural teaching practices; usage of gender pronouns)), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Through discussion programming and events as well as newsletters

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

average attendance to events, annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance