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The Regents Center for Learning Disorders

College of Arts and Sciences

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate, Graduate, Postbaccalaureate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Massey-Connolly, Susan
smasseyconnolly@gsu.edu
404-413-6245

Address
140 Decatur Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

State Funding

Overview

The Regents Center for Learning Disorders (RCLD) at Georgia State University is one of three centers established by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents to provide assessment, training, research and resources related to students who have learning disorders or other impairments. Our mission is to empower University System of Georgia students with learning difficulties to rise above their challenges and provide them with a path forward for academic success.

Benefits

The RCLD offers cost reduced comprehensive psychological evaluations to students at 11 USG schools across 19 campuses in order to determine appropriate academic accommodations needed to mitigate barriers to learning. The center also serves as a practicum training site for beginning and advanced graduate level psychology students through practical test administration and weekly didactic training. Additionally, staff members of the RCLD regularly participate in outreach training and consultation to USG schools on matters of disability related services including legal aspects, case reviews, serving on planning committees and best practices for implementation of accommodations for students with disabilities.

Supplemental Materials

Not Applicable

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
05/01/1993

Number Served
>10,000

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Specialized center

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The RCLD is a specialized center for the assessment, diagnosis and intervention for learning disorders or other psychological factors that limit academic success. Practicum students learn these skills through weekly didactic and practical administration with clients.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

Both practicum students and those seeking evaluation receive feedback via psychoeducation to not only identify areas of disability, but to also discuss strengths and interventions that can foster success

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Our students (both clinical and client) come from diverse backgrounds and experiences that inform who they are and how they approach the world. These factors are considered when supervising the developmental progress of student clinicians and in offering context to client history and data. Feedback is offered to clients at their level in ways that are meaningful to them.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

Students are encouraged to offer suggestions on training goals and topics

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Practicum students are encouraged to share both informal and professional experiences during supervision and receive progress reviews and periodic feedback. Clients share relevant information during assessment interview.

Evaluation Methods

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, other

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

Key Performance Indicators

We track the number of clients seen, time to completion of consultations or assessments and schedule of supervisions and training

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
05/01/1993

Number Served
>10,000

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Specialized center

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

The RCLD is a specialized center for the assessment, diagnosis and intervention for learning disorders or other psychological factors that limit academic success. Practicum students learn these skills through weekly didactic and practical administration with clients.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

Both practicum students and those seeking evaluation receive feedback via psychoeducation to not only identify areas of disability, but to also discuss strengths and interventions that can foster success

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Our students (both clinical and client) come from diverse backgrounds and experiences that inform who they are and how they approach the world. These factors are considered when supervising the developmental progress of student clinicians and in offering context to client history and data. Feedback is offered to clients at their level in ways that are meaningful to them.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Additional Information

Students are encouraged to offer suggestions on training goals and topics

Participant Empowerment

Coaching, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentors exchange social displays of scientific knowledge and practices, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentors provide support with academic or discipline specific knowledge through direct teaching, Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

Practicum students are encouraged to share both informal and professional experiences during supervision and receive progress reviews and periodic feedback. Clients share relevant information during assessment interview.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

external review/evaluation, annual performance report, other

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),developing intellectual property (e.g., artwork, inventions, scholarly work, bacteriophages, genomic sequences, algorithms, software, etc.),increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning a degree, obtaining employment (industry or other sector),moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)