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TRIO Student Support Services- Classic and STEM

Student Engagement

Academic Initiative

Groups Served
Collegiate

Program Website
Visit the Program Website

Contact Information
Turner,Donnia
dmturner@gsu.edu
404-413-1681

Address
33 Gilmer Street
Atlanta, GA 30303

Building
Sparks Hall

Campus
Atlanta

Funding

US Department of Education (ED)

Overview

The Student Support Services (SSS) program provides support services to first-generation, low-income and/or students with disabilities. The goal of the SSS program is to increase the college retention and graduation rates of its participants and is based upon the belief that all students, regardless of age, family background, learning styles, or presence of a disability, should have equal opportunity to reach their full personal, academic and career potential.

Benefits

TRIO SSS aims to increase the academic and career potential of its participants. Eligible students may receive (among other services) tutoring, cursory academic advisement and coaching, financial/economic literacy, college tours, career preparation, academic and success workshops. These services, which are provided at no cost to students, all promote the progression and academic success of students.

Supplemental Materials

TRiO Support Services Flyer

Discipline Focus
Not discipline specific (University-Wide)

Diversity Group ( Social Identity)
Ability/Disability, First Generation, Socioeconomic Status

Race/Ethnic Group
Does not provide racial/ethnic minority group specialized programming

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/1975

Number Served
1501-2000

Notable Alumni

Anil Lewis, Executive Director for Blindness Initiatives
Delucious Patterson, Senior Associate, Campus Recruiting
Maximillian Naza, Software Developer
Ecclesia Holmes, Licensed Professional Counselor
Kashif Molwani, Investment Professional

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

SSS has a designated space on campus which allows participants to utilize specific program services that are available to them. This central space helps to foster a sense of community and belonging among participants. The program provides students with professional development sessions, inclusive of employer networking events, conferences, career preparation, business etiquette and resume building events and opportunities as well as peer tutoring and peer mentoring, all of which promote the academic and career development of each student. SSS also makes available to its staff professional development opportunities including in-house and external training sessions and conferences.

Self-efficacy Emphasis

The program provides academic support and services to students from the same or similar backgrounds. Through events such as orientations and peer mentoring, participants hear from their peers about their successes, serving as an example and encouragement for participants. Academic peer coaching is provided to participants in order to develop new and existing skill sets, resulting in increased student competency. Networking events and workshops are also facilitated.

Acknowledgement/Affirmation of Identity, Strengths, Needs

Conduct intakes with students; Utilize information from student needs assessments in order to develop individual action plans with prescribed services. Administer personality, strengths and career assessments to give students insight on their interests, strengths and growth areas. Ascertain student performance from academic progress reports and early alerts to identify areas in need of intervention. Acknowledging student voice during advisement sessions and events such as group discussions.

Examples of Inclusionary Practices and Activities

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

The program facilitates various academic, personal and career workshops/conferences which provide opportunities for students to engage in open dialogue with presenters and other peers. Students are also encouraged to provide feedback through evaluations and surveys at the conclusion of these events. Orientations, peer mentoring and academic coaching also allow students to hear from and engage with peers in an open and safe environment about their own experiences, challenges and successes.

Evaluation Methods

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated Participant Outcomes

attendance, completion of a course(s),increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning a degree, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)

Outcome Milestones

% of students who persist from one academic year to the next, % of students who remain in good academic standing, % of students who graduate within six years

Key Performance Indicators

# of students served in the program during the academic year; GPA and % of students in good academic standing; # of students receiving/referred for tutoring; # of students receiving/referred for advice and assistance in course selection; # of students receiving/referred for financial and economic literacy; # of students receiving/referred for FAFSA information and application assistance; # of students receiving/referred for assistance in applying for admission to and financial aid for graduate school

Program, Initiative, Policy or Sponsored Award Category

Priority 1: Academic Initiative

Established
09/01/1975

Number Served
1501-2000

Notable Alumni

Anil Lewis, Executive Director for Blindness Initiatives
Delucious Patterson, Senior Associate, Campus Recruiting
Maximillian Naza, Software Developer
Ecclesia Holmes, Licensed Professional Counselor
Kashif Molwani, Investment Professional

Research Components and Activities

Program sponsored (in-house) professional development sessions/ coursework (e.g., workshops, test preparation, mini-courses, specialized course, conference presentations, resume/cv building, tutoring, professional development etiquette), Funding to attend professional development sessions/coursework (e.g., conference travel, professional development session/coursework registration fee, application fee waiver, book purchase), Specialized center, Student or faculty stipend/compensation, Mentor honorarium/stipend

Additional Research Components, Roles and Responsibilities

SSS has a designated space on campus which allows participants to utilize specific program services that are available to them. This central space helps to foster a sense of community and belonging among participants. The program provides students with professional development sessions, inclusive of employer networking events, conferences, career preparation, business etiquette and resume building events and opportunities as well as peer tutoring and peer mentoring, all of which promote the academic and career development of each student. SSS also makes available to its staff professional development opportunities including in-house and external training sessions and conferences.

Please describe how your program addresses self-efficacy (one's beliefs in their own ability to execute behaviors necessary to perform) in its participants?

The program provides academic support and services to students from the same or similar backgrounds. Through events such as orientations and peer mentoring, participants hear from their peers about their successes, serving as an example and encouragement for participants. Academic peer coaching is provided to participants in order to develop new and existing skill sets, resulting in increased student competency. Networking events and workshops are also facilitated.

How does your program acknowledge or affirm individuals’ different identities, strengths, or needs?

Conduct intakes with students; Utilize information from student needs assessments in order to develop individual action plans with prescribed services. Administer personality, strengths and career assessments to give students insight on their interests, strengths and growth areas. Ascertain student performance from academic progress reports and early alerts to identify areas in need of intervention. Acknowledging student voice during advisement sessions and events such as group discussions.

Inclusionary practices/activities utilized in your program:

Specialized Curricula/Workshops (e.g. training for participants, directors and/or faculty on imposter syndrome, implicit bias, microaggressions), Structured Dialogues and Interactions (e.g. lab discussions, one-on-one sessions, virtual dialogues), Orientation (e.g. reviewing norms, expectations, structures, goals and/or protocols),Development of Academic Sense of Belongingness (e.g. Meetings with doctoral scholars, peer researchers, exchanges at academic conferences), Creation of a Safe space/ climate/environment

Participant Empowerment

Academic recognition (i.e. research credibility, prestige), Coaching, Institutional alliances, Knowledge transfer to the community (e.g., parents, peers, stakeholders), Mentoring opportunities

Mentoring Components

Mentors are peers of program participants (near-peer, tiered peer, etc.), Mentors provide regular scheduled meetings with mentees, Mentors provide psychological and or emotional support, Mentees are given information about academic customs, pitfalls, departmental politics and taboos, Mentors provide support with goal setting and or career planning, Mentees are allowed to attend events with mentors (i.e., dinners, social events, conferences, retreats), Mentors provide mentees with access to academic resources (e.g. precollegiate/collegiate/graduate/postdoc/ faculty training; standardized test preparation; writing workshops, research workshops, tenure and promotion information), Mentor recognizes the value of the mentee. (i.e., co-authorship, graduate school/employment references)

Opportunities to Privilege Voice

The program facilitates various academic, personal and career workshops/conferences which provide opportunities for students to engage in open dialogue with presenters and other peers. Students are also encouraged to provide feedback through evaluations and surveys at the conclusion of these events. Orientations, peer mentoring and academic coaching also allow students to hear from and engage with peers in an open and safe environment about their own experiences, challenges and successes.

Evaluation methods are used to substantiate the program’s outcomes:

annual performance report, program survey(s)

Anticipated participant outcomes for your program:

attendance, completion of a course(s),increasing academic skill area (s),persisting through current degree program, earning a degree, moving to the next level of the pipeline (e.g. high school to college; college to grad school; grad school to post doc; graduate to faculty)